Subscribe to RSS - Incorporate future conditions into natural resources planning and policies

Abstract

Maintaining sustainable forest management practices in Canada during the 21st century and beyond will be a major challenge, given the uncertainties of global socioeconomic development and multiple interacting consequences of global environmental change. Scenarios represent an important tool for decision makers to use in exploring the causes and effects of possible changes in future environmental conditions and the implications of those changes for forests and the social, environmental, and economic benefits that forests provide.

Abstract

Any organization planning to proactively manage for climate change effects needs a game plan. A crucial first step is to identify the strengths and capabilities, along with weaknesses and gaps, that will affect the organization’s readiness to respond to the challenges of climate change. The organizational readiness of any business or other entity is based on its own combination of institutional structure and function, financial resources, acquisition and use of information, know-how, and adaptive decision making.

Abstract

Climate change is an unprecedented issue in modern times, posing a number of challenges to sustainable forest management (SFM) in Canada. These challenges include how best to plan and adapt for an uncertain future. The Canadian Council of Forest Ministers (CCFM) has recognized the need to minimize the risks and maximize the opportunities that climate change presents for Canada’s forests and forest sector and has therefore initiated collaborative, interjurisdictional work on adaptation in forestry.

Abstract

Innovative and unique solutions are being devised throughout the national park system to adapt to climate change in coastal parks. The 24 case studies in this document describe efforts at national park units in a variety of settings to prepare for and respond to climate change impacts that can take the form of either an event or a trend. Examples of these impacts include increased storminess, sea level rise, shoreline erosion, melting sea ice and permafrost, ocean acidification, warming temperatures, groundwater inundation, precipitation, and drought.

Location

United States
25° 18' 37.8396" N, 81° 0' 7.9092" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Fred Herling

Project Summary

Visitor facilities in the Flamingo area of Everglades National Park in Florida were destroyed by two hurricanes in 2005. Incorporating climate change sustainability into the redevelopment plan has required extensive data gathering efforts and public engagement. 

Location

United States
38° 5' 17.7756" N, 122° 49' 56.5824" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Lorraine Parsons and Sarah Allen

Project Summary

Point Reyes National Seashore developed the Giacomini Wetland Restoration Project to restore tidal wetlands from diked agricultural lands. Restoration efforts were accomplished through subgoals to engage the public, manage public access, protect pre- and post-project habitats for multiple listed species, build in resilience to accommodate for potential climate change effects, and adaptively monitor effectiveness of management actions. 

Location

AS
United States
14° 14' 52.7064" S, 170° 40' 22.0044" W
American Samoa US
Author Name(s): 
Tim Clark

Project Summary

Ofu Lagoon, part of the National Park of American Samoa, contains a healthy coral reef habitat that supports a diversity of species. The park is working with university partners towards the goal of understanding the unique adaptations of the coral in Ofu Lagoon to multiple environmental stressors associated with climate change.

Location

United States
32° 1' 22.08" N, 80° 52' 56.406" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Mike Eissenberg

Project Summary

The goal of this project was to develop a plan to stabilize a historic lighthouse at Fort Pulaski National Monument in a way that considered expected sea level rise and related impacts.

Location

United States
44° 25' 52.8492" N, 110° 22' 12.2484" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Rebecca Beavers, Courtney Schupp, Ian Slayton, Maria Caffrey

Project Summary

Yellowstone National Park collaborated with the National Park Service Geologic Resources Division (NPS GRD) to examine the causes of shoreline erosion on Peale Island and to identify adaptation options for protecting the shoreline and a historic cabin on the island. 

Location

United States
24° 37' 42.5172" N, 82° 52' 23.4732" W
US
Author Name(s): 
Dan Kimball, Marcy Rockman, and Kelly Clark

Project Summary

Sea level rise and increased tropical storm intensity pose a serious risk to the long-term sustainability of historic Fort Jefferson at Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida. The park is trying to mitigate these effects over time through strategic planning, informed decision making, and responsible investments that consider historical integrity and long-term sustainability of the fort and island on which it was built. 

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