Subscribe to RSS - Incorporate future conditions into natural resources planning and policies

Abstract

The growing threat of climate change combined with escalating anthropogenic stressors on coral reefs requires a response that is both proactive and adaptive. To respond to this challenge, The Nature Conservancy convened a group of global ocean experts in Honolulu, Hawaii from August 12-14, 2008. The workshop participants included oceanographers, climate experts, marine scientists, and coral reef managers from around the world.

Abstract

From the Introduction:

This review aims to answer the question: what is the threat of climate change to birds? Knowledge in this field is advancing rapidly. More is known about birds than any other class of animals, and of all groups of plants and animals the scientific analysis of likely future impacts from climate change is most developed for birds. Furthermore, birds provide some of the clearest examples of impacts already underway.

Abstract

The Six Specific Goals of Kentucky's Climate Change Action Plan:Goal 1: Conserve and restore functioning ecosystems in Kentucky
Goal 2: Create or protect “key” or “concentrating” habitats
Goal 3: Implement multi-agency plans for wildlife corridors/connectivity in Kentucky
Goal 4: Monitor fish, wildlife, and ecosystem responses to climate change

Abstract

The Technical Paper addresses the issue of freshwater. Sealevel rise is dealt with only insofar as it can lead to impacts on freshwater in coastal areas and beyond. Climate, freshwater, biophysical and socio-economic systems are interconnected in complex ways. Hence, a change in any one of these can induce a change in any other. Freshwater-related issues are critical in determining key regional and sectoral vulnerabilities. Therefore, the relationship between climate change and freshwater resources is of primary concern to human society and also has implications for all living species.

Abstract

The National Academy of Sciences’ report on Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change is part of the America’s Climate Choices suite of studies that was requested by Congress.  The report concludes that much of the nation’s experience to date in managing and protecting its people, resources, and infrastructure is based on the historic record of climate variability during a period of relatively stable climate.  Adaptation to climate change calls for a new paradigm—one that considers a range of possible future climate conditions and ­associated impacts, some well outside the realm of

Abstract

Adaptation in forestry is sustainable forest management that includes a climate change focus. Climate change over the next 100 years is expected to have significant impacts on forest ecosystems. The forestry community needs to evaluate the long-term effects of climate change on forests and determine what the community might do now and in the future to respond to this threat. Management can influence the timing and direction of forest adaptation at selected locations, but in many situations society will have to adjust to however forests adapt.

Abstract

Presentation from the International Workshop on Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate Change: From Practice to Policy on May 11-12, New Delhi by Dr. Pushpam Kumar of the Institute of Economic Growth.

This presentation highlights why biodiversity loss and unsustainable use of ecosystems services affects and will continue to affect human well-being. The author surmises by stating that ecosystems management and biodiversity conservation have strong bearing on the success of adaptation strategies.

Abstract

There is evidence that climate change is already affecting biodiversity and will continue to do so. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment ranks climate change among the main direct drivers affecting ecosystems. Consequences of climate change on the species component of biodiversity include:

•changes in distribution,

•increased extinction rates,

•changes in reproduction timings, and

•changes in length of growing seasons for plants.

Abstract

Bolivia is particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change for six basic reasons:

1. It is one of the poorest countries in Latin America and suffers from one of the worst patterns of inequality. Low-income groups in developing countries are the most exposed to climate change impacts.

2. It is the country in South America with the highest percentage of indigenous people, where much of the poverty and inequality is concentrated.

Abstract

The need for climate change adaptation has become increasingly widely recognised in the last 20 years. Nature conservation was one of the first sectors to identify the need and to start developing approaches. To date, much of the focus has been on identifying general principles. This was an essential first step, but adaptation needs to be embedded into decision-making in specific places and circumstances. There can be a big gap between general principles and specific applications.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Incorporate future conditions into natural resources planning and policies