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RainReady

Tool Overview: 

RainReady℠ is a trademarked initiative of the Center for Neighborhood Technology, a national nonprofit headquartered in Chicago. We help people manage flooding and drought in a time of climate change.

How does RainReady work?

Green Infrastructure Toolkit

Tool Overview: 

The purpose of this toolkit is to analyze common trends in the approaches various cities are taking to planning, implementing, and funding green infrastructure to manage stormwater. The toolkit is intended to aid local governments nationwide in comparing best practices across cities, drawing lessons from different approaches, and crafting similar policies for their own jurisdictions.

Tribal Climate Resilience Resource Guide (TCRRG)

Tool Overview: 

This Tribal Climate Resilience Resource Guide (TCRRG) was developed by the Climate Subgroup of the White House Council on Native American Affairs to provide federal government-wide resources for tribes and climate in a standard framework. Each of the 567 federally-recognized Tribes can visit their Tribal Fact Sheet "Climate Dashboard" to learn about federal agencies and programs that may assist them to build resilience, whether to manage disasters, relocate, contend with shifting subsistence species, mitigate the human causes of climate change, or address other climate impacts on lifeways.

Climate Smart Cities™

Tool Overview: 

Cities are on the front line of climate change. They can be an important part of the solution by offering energy-efficient living for our growing population—but they must also face the growing threat of heat waves and flooding. Our Climate-Smart Cities program helps cities nationwide create parks and conserve land to meet the climate challenge.

We help cities use parks and natural lands as “green infrastructure” serving four objectives:

Climate & Disaster Risk Screening Tools

Tool Overview: 

The Climate and Disaster Risk Screening Tools developed by the World Bank, provide a systematic, consistent, and transparent way of considering short- and long-term climate and disaster risks in project and national/sector planning processes. Screening is an initial, but essential, step to ensure these risks are assessed and managed to support mainstreaming of climate and disaster resilience into key development policies, programs, and projects. 

Climate Change & Extreme Weather Vulnerability Assessment Framework

Tool Overview: 

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA's) Climate Change & Extreme Weather Vulnerability Assessment Framework is a guide and collection of resources for use in analyzing the impacts of climate change and extreme weather on transportation infrastructure. Its purpose is to identify key considerations, questions, and resources that can be used to design and implement a climate change vulnerability assessment.

CMIP Climate Data Processing Tool

Tool Overview: 

The purpose of the U.S. Department of Transportation's Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) Climate Data Processing Tool is to process readily available downscaled climate data at the local level into relevant statistics for transportation planners. This tool works with data used by the Downscaled CMIP3 and CMIP5 Climate and Hydrology Projections (DCHP) website. This website houses climate model data from phase 3 (CMIP3) and phase 5 (CMIP5) of the World Climate Research Programme.

Abstract

This Economic Guide provides a standard economic methodology for evaluating investment decisions aimed to improve the ability of communities to adapt to, withstand, and quickly recover from disruptive events.

Abstract

Coastal communities face constant challenges from shoreline erosion. Although erosion is a natural coastal process, many valuable resources border the nation’s coastline. Shorelines need protection from damage caused by intense storms, wave erosion, and sea level rise. Shoreline stabilization does not need to create a barrier between land and water, as happens with hard shoreline stabilization structures like seawalls and bulkheads. New stabilization options, like living shorelines, are gaining attention as an alternative to traditional shoreline stabilization techniques.

Abstract

Changes in climate create diverse challenges across the U.S. energy system. Some energy infrastructure assets have already suffered damage or disruption in services from a variety of climate-related impacts, such as higher temperatures, rising sea levels, and more severe weather events. In the absence of concerted action to improve resilience, energy system vulnerabilities pose a threat to America’s national security, energy security, economic well- being, and quality of life.

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