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Abstract

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in North Africa was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011.

Abstract

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including West Africa. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively.

Abstract

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including the Caribbean. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively.

Abstract

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including southern Africa. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively.

Abstract

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant increase in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including Central Asia. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively.

Location

United States
48° 27' 26.0712" N, 123° 22' 5.61" W
US

Project Summary

Two hundred and twenty thousand people living in the Metro Vancouver region of British Columbia are protected by approximately 127 kilometres of coastal dikes. The dikes are managed by local government diking authorities that follow provincial guidelines in dike design and construction. Local governments also follow provincial guidelines in zoning and approving developments in the coastal floodplain.

Abstract

From the Executive Summary:

In most parts of Canada, climate change is increasingly affecting the way water moves through the hydrologic cycle, which up until now has fluctuated within a fixed envelope of certainty. This relatively stable regime is termed ‘stationarity’ by hydrologists. The hydro-climatic conditions that are emerging in response to climate change are increasingly outside this established range to which Canadians have demonstrated an ability to adapt over the last century.

Abstract

One of the most publicized impacts of global warming is a predicted acceleration of sea level rise. Water levels in San Francisco Bay could rise by 1.4 meters by the end of this century and flood over 330 square miles of low-lying shoreline property and $60 billion of property. The San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission has formulated a broad outline of a comprehensive strategy for addressing climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to sea level rise in the Bay Area region.

Abstract

From the Executive Summary:Lewes, Delaware, with its strong history of hazard mitigation planning and preparedness is perfectly poised to take advantage of an increasing understanding of climate change impacts. It is already known that temperatures are rising, glaciers are retreating, snowpack is disappearing, spring is arriving earlier, and seas are rising. These changes will exacerbate hazards that are known to threaten Lewes today.

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