Subscribe to RSS - Natural Resource Management / Conservation

Abstract

Sea level rise presents a significant climate change adaptation challenge for California. The state has over 3400 miles of coastline, millions of coastal residents, and an economy dependent on coastal natural resources. Higher sea levels threaten residents, public and private development, critical infrastructure, and natural resources with increased risk of flooding, inundation, storm damage, shoreline erosion, saltwater intrusion, and beach loss.

Abstract

This report by the Florida Coastal and Ocean Coalition details how climate change could impact the state's coastal areas, and it broadly outlines possible adaptation solutions. It is intended to provide guidelines for concrete, science-based action on the critical issues Florida faces in light of climate change and to stimulate informed debate for the preservation of Florida's natural resources.

Abstract

Predicting climate change impacts on biodiversity is a major scientific challenge, but doing so is important for assessing extinction risk, developing conservation action plans, providing guidance for laws and regulations, and identifying the mechanisms and patterns of impact to inform climate change adaptation. In the few decades since the threat of climate change has been recognised, the conservation community has begun assessing vulnerability to climate change.

Abstract

The Delaware Estuary watershed and its natural resources will face a variety of challenges with climate change. Due to the many unique features of the Estuary, some aspects of changing climate may not be as severe here as in nearby watersheds and estuaries, whereas other changes may be more important. Since 2008, the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary has engaged experts from throughout the region to conduct an assessment of the vulnerabilities and adaptation options for three key resources of the Delaware Estuary: tidal wetlands, drinking water, and bivalve shellfish.

Abstract

Focus of this report

Since the early years of the 21st century, and in particular since 2007, the U.S. has been awakening rapidly to the fact that climate change is underway and that even if stringent efforts are undertaken to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, adaptation to the unavoidable impacts from the existing commitment to climate change is still needed and needs to be begun now.

Abstract

In June 2013, President Obama announced his comprehensive plan for steady, responsible action to cut carbon pollution, prepare the Nation for the impacts of climate change, and lead international efforts to address climate change as a global challenge.

Abstract

Local governments are on the front line of efforts to address climate-related impacts. Recognizing this, there is a growing movement to develop and deliver tools, resources, and services to support local communities’ climate adaptation initiatives. There is, however, limited understanding of what specific types of resources exist and how well these resources match the needs of local practitioners.

Abstract

The Gulf Coast faces a constant storm. Man’s efforts to tame the Mississippi River with flood control structures have led to many unintended consequences, primarily the degradation of the Mississippi River Delta. Throughout the Gulf Region, land loss caused by subsidence, sea-level rise, and the alteration of critical environmental processes has stripped the Gulf Coast of its natural defenses and is accelerating the collapse of coastal ecosystems.

Abstract

The effects of climate change on marine ecosystems are accelerating. Identifying and protecting areas of the ocean where conditions are most stable may provide another tool for adaptation to climate change. To date, research on potential marine climate refugia has focused on tropical systems, particularly coral reefs. We examined a northeast Pacific temperate region – Canada’s Pacific – toidentify areas where physical conditions are stable or changing slowly.

Location

St. Paul , MN
United States
44° 57' 13.3308" N, 93° 5' 23.8488" W
Minnesota US

Project Summary

Mississippi Park Connection and the National Park Service is coordinating volunteers to work on a gravel bed tree nursery project at the Science Museum of Minnesota’s Saint Paul campus. The gravel bed nursery will feature trees that are adapted to climate change conditions, such as Kentucky coffeetree, and will eventually be planted in Saint Paul along the Mississippi River. Volunteers from the Minnesota GreenCorps program, the 2017 National Adaptation Forum, and the general public will perform the work. 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Natural Resource Management / Conservation