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Abstract

Community-based conservation (CBC) is based on the idea that if conservation and development could be simultaneously achieved, then the interests of both could be served. It has been controversial because community development objectives are not necessarily consistent with conservation objectives in a given case. I examined CBC from two angles. First, CBC can be seen in the context of paradigm shifts in ecology and applied ecology.

Abstract

Climate warming and resource development could alter key Arctic ecosystem functions that support fish and wildlife resources harvested by local indigenous communities. A different set of global forces—government policies and tourism markets—increasingly directs local cash economies that communities use to support subsistence activities. Agent-based computational models (ABMs) contribute to an integrated assessment of community sustainability by simulating how people interact with each other and adapt to changing economic and environmental conditions.

Abstract

This assessment was prepared over the past five years by an international team of over 300 scientists, other experts, and knowledgeable members of the indigenous communities. The lead authors were selected from open nominations provided by AMAP, CAFF, IASC, the Indigenous Peoples Secretariat, the Assessment Steering Committee, and several national and international scientific organizations.

Abstract

As we stand at the beginning of the new millennium, the threats to nature and protected areas are unprecedented. While some progress has been made and strategies such as protected areas have been successful in preserving biodiversity in some places, new threats are arising.

Abstract

From the Introduction:Climate provides fundamental limits on and opportunities for human activities and ecosystem functioning within the Great Lakes region. A changing climate could lead to alterations in the frequency and severity of droughts and floods; water supply; air, soil, and water quality; ecosystem health; human health; and resource use and the economy. Climate change may act through multiple pathways; interactions in and impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem can be dynamic and non-linear.

Abstract

This paper synthesises much of the current scientific knowledge on coral reef resistance and resilience to bleaching, a possible major effect of climate change. Following a brief overview of coral bleaching and what is meant by resistance and resilience, the paper highlights a variety of resistance and resilience factors and identifies some gaps in knowledge. It continues by providing an overview of some of the tools and strategies we can use to enhance coral reef resilience.

Abstract

This research report evaluates the utility of the ClimAdapt Guide. ClimAdapt is a partnership between the Nova Scotia Environmental Industries Association, six private companies, the Nova Scotia Department of Environment and Labour, the Halifax Regional Municipality, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and C-CAIRN. The Guide incorporates climate change considerations into the environmental impact assessment (EIA) process. It is applied to six Canadian case studies covering a wide range of project types and climate areas in Canada.

Abstract

Aim: Conservation strategies currently include little consideration of climate change. Insights about the biotic impacts of climate change from biogeography and palaeoecology, therefore, have the potential to provide significant improvements in the effectiveness of conservation planning. We suggest a collaboration involving biogeography, ecology and applied conservation.

Abstract

Advice to Government on linkages between biodiversity and climate change was prepared by Landcare Research, Lincoln, for the Ministry for the Environment in June – August 2001.

Abstract

A shift in ocean climate during the late 1970s triggered a reorganization of community structure in the Gulf of Alaska ecosystem, as evidenced in changing catch composition on long-term (1953 to 1997) small-mesh trawl surveys. Forage species such as pandalid shrimp and capelin declined because of recruitment failure and predation, and populations have not yet recovered. Total trawl catch biomass declined >5O% and remained low through the 1980s.

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