Resource Stewardship Objectives and Actions for Climate Change-Sensitive Cultural and Natural Resources in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve

Gregor W. Schuurman, Amber N. Runyon, Brecken C. Robb, Morris Hylton III, Jeneva P. Wright
Posted on: 3/12/2024 - Updated on: 3/12/2024

Posted by

CAKE Team

Published

Abstract

This report presents climate change-informed resource stewardship strategies for diverse WrangellSt. Elias National Park and Preserve natural and cultural resources. 

The strategies were developed in early 2022 by park staff and other subject-matter experts in a scenario-based climate change adaptation planning process. Strategy development was facilitated by National Park Service (NPS) climate change adaptation specialists. Strategies address critical climate change implications for park resources identified in an immediately preceding (fall-2021) climate-resource scenario development process.

The overall, nearly-year-long scenario- and strategy-development process was entirely virtual due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although this circumstance was constraining in some ways, it also provided many benefits, including lower barriers to participant entry, smoother pacing, more opportunities to incorporate personal reflection and individual work, and more points in the process where facilitators could intervene to support participants or make changes. Absence of travel costs, plus organization of the process into a larger number of smaller steps than in the past, allowed the 11 participating park resource management staff to include a large pool of several dozen federal, tribal, state, academic, and private-sector partners. Climate change adaptation strategies are most likely to foster climate change-informed resource stewardship when they support a specific planning process. In this case, that process was the 2021–2023 development of the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve Resource Stewardship Strategy. 

A Resource Stewardship Strategy is a dynamic planning tool that parks use to set goals for natural and cultural resource stewardship, identify activities to achieve and maintain desired conditions, and track progress.

Citation

Gregor W. Schuurman, Amber N. Runyon, Brecken C. Robb, Morris Hylton III, Jeneva P. Wright. (2024). Resource Stewardship Objectives and Actions for Climate Change-Sensitive Cultural and Natural Resources in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. National Park Service (NPS).

Affiliated Organizations

Since 1916, the American people have entrusted the National Park Service with the care of their national parks. With the help of volunteers and park partners, we are proud to safeguard these nearly 400 places and to share their stories with more than 275 million visitors every year. But our work doesn’t stop there.

The U.S. Department of the Interior protects and manages the Nation's natural resources and cultural heritage; provides scientific and other information about those resources; and honors its trust responsibilities or special commitments to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and affiliated Island Communities. The Interior heads eight technical bureaus: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, Minerals Management Service, National Park Service, Office of Surface Mining, Reclamation and Enforcement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S.

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