Using a Precautionary Approach to Manage North Pacific Fisheries Under Uncertainty

Created: 6/30/2010 - Updated: 12/05/2018

Summary

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council is authorized to manage the fisheries within the Exclusive Economic Zone of the State of Alaska, which includes the Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands, and the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. The Council has adopted a precautionary approach to commercial fishing opportunities that may arise as a result of climate change in the Arctic, including prohibiting certain activities until the best science becomes available. The Council has established limits to minimize bycatch, seasonal restrictions, and gear requirements (e.g., prohibition of bottom trawling) to diminish effects on mammals, birds, and habitat. The Council has also created some protected areas to protect sensitive habitats (e.g., deep sea corals) and areas where scientific information is limited (Chukchi and Beaufort Seas).

Background

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council is one of the eight regional councils that oversee fisheries management in the United States in conjunction with the National Marine Fisheries Service. Members include representatives from state and federal fisheries agencies, commercial and recreational industries, communities, the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, and the U.S. Department of State. The Council has jurisdiction over the 900,000 square mile Exclusive Economic Zone of the State of Alaska, which includes the Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands, and the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. The Council manages Pacific cod, pollock, flatfish, mackerel, sablefish, and rockfish on its own and jointly manages salmon, crab, and scallops with the State of Alaska. In addition, the Council works with the International Pacific Halibut Commission to allocate halibut landings for the United States and Canada.

The Council has implemented a precautionary approach to manage fisheries in the Arctic in order to deal with uncertainty surrounding the effects of climate change. Fishing in the Arctic has not been historically developed because sea ice has blocked passage and access to marine resources in the region; melting sea ice, warmer waters, and expanding species’ ranges may increase the opportunities for commercial fishing development in the Arctic and in 2009, the Council recognized the need to prepare for and respond to these possibilities.

Implementation

In February 2009, the Council adopted the Arctic Fishery Management Plan; this plan was approved by U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke in August 2009 and effective in December 2009. The plan closes the Arctic waters within the Exclusive Economic Zone of Alaska to all commercial fishing activity until sufficient scientific research indicates otherwise. The plan has received support from the fishing industry, managers, conservation practitioners and groups, and community leaders. In addition, the Council has prohibited bottom trawling over nearly 673,000 square miles within its jurisdiction in order to protect habitat.

Outcomes and Conclusions

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council has used a precautionary and collaborative approach to deal with the uncertainty surrounding the effects of climate change on the Arctic environment and possible commercial fishing development; this approach could act as a model for other groups looking to address large-scale effects of global climate change.

Status

Information gathered from online resources. Last updated on 6/30/10.

Citation

Gregg, R.M. (2010). Using a Precautionary Approach to Manage North Pacific Fisheries Under Uncertainty [Case study on a project of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council]. Product of EcoAdapt's State of Adaptation Program. Retrieved from CAKE: www.cakex.org/case-studies/using-precautionary-approach-manage-north-pac... (Last updated June 2010)

Project Contacts

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC) is one of eight regional councils established by the Magnuson Fishery Conservation and Management Act in 1976 (which has been renamed the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act) to oversee management of the nation's fisheries.

Keywords

Scale of Project: 
National / Federal
State / Provincial
Sector Addressed: 
Fisheries
Target Climate Changes and Impacts: 
Air temperature
Economics
Fishery harvest
Habitat extent
Phenological shifts
Range shifts
Species of concern
Water temperature
Other
Climate Type: 
Polar
Subpolar
Timeframe: 
Ongoing
Type of Adaptation Action/Strategy: 
Natural Resource Management / Conservation
Incorporate climate change into harvest/take policies
Create new refugia / Increase size and amount of protected areas
Reduce non-climate stressors
Governance and Policy
Create new or enhance existing policies or regulations
Taxonomic Focus: 
Fishes
Effort Stage: 
In progress