Sagadahoc Region, Maine Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Adapting to climate change in the Sagadahoc region will be a multifaceted endeavor with planning and implementation required at both the local and regional scales. At the regional scale, a shared vision of a resilient landscape will be essential to informing local planning and development decisions. In an effort to build on previous regional planning initiatives and add climate change considerations to the analysis, Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences analyzed riparian resources, important habitat areas and prime farm land to identify the regional green infrastructure network depicted in Maps 1-4. The green infrastructure network for the Sagadahoc region is a starting point for local and regional decisions on adapting to climate change. Refining development controls to protect high priority conservation lands will support resiliency to freshwater flooding and nonpoint source pollution, minimize exposure of new development to sea level rise, enhance biodiversity and support food security for the region. The Sagadahoc region has a significant opportunity for climate smart planning in that the relatively intact natural landscape provides valuable adaptation services at little or no cost. Health and safety benefits and minimization of tax burden are available to the communities of the region if they work together to protect a functional green infrastructure network as future development takes place.

Integrating Climate Risks into Local Planning in Alameda County, California

Location

Alameda County, California CA
United States
37° 45' 53.9892" N, 122° 13' 20.9532" W
California US
Organization: 
Four Twenty Seven
Organization: 
Summary: 

Cities across the United States face the challenge of integrating climate change considerations into their planning. Climate data is complex and fragmented, and often presented in a format and scale that are not aligned with planners’ needs. To support the integration of climate change adaptation into relevant plans such as local hazard mitigation plans, Four Twenty Seven, a California-based climate risk consulting firm, worked with the Alameda County waste authority to develop:

Cambridge Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment - Part 2

CCVA - Part 2 focuses on the risks from sea level rise and storm surges.  The summary report and two technical reports describe the methods and results from applying the Boston Harbor Flood Risk Model, which is based on the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model, in a vulnerability assessment of key assets and populations in Cambridge, MA.  The Part 2 report complements the Part 1 report, which focuses on the risks from increasing temperatures and precipitation.  The two CCVA Reports form the technical foundation for the Cambridge Climate Change Preparedness & Resilience Plan that is being developed.

Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for Priority Wildlife Species

The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife and the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment jointly developed a climate-change vulnerability assessment for priority wildlife and plant species and habitats on the Navajo landscape. The priority species and habitats included in this analysis were identified by the entire staff of NNDFW through a structured planning process.

This report provides a summary of projected climate-change impacts for the southwestern United States and Navajo lands as well as an assessment of attributes promoting climate vulnerability and resilience for priority wildlife and plant species. Animal species discussed in this report are the Golden Eagle, Mule Deer, Desert Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Lion, and American Black Bear. Plant species discussed in this report include Pinyon Pine, Yucca spp., Mesa Verde Cactus, Navajo Sage, and Salt Cedar (Tamarisk).

This vulnerability assessment provides a conceptual framework for further climate adaptation planning on the Navajo landscape within an adaptive management context. Specific climate adaptation actions that are proposed in this report include: conservation of wildlife movement corridors; “climate smart” reintroductions of Desert Bighorn Sheep; consideration of Golden Eagles in the planning and siting of renewable energy developments; and actions to reduce human conflicts with Black Bears. An example is provided to show how landscape connectivity analyses can be used to identify areas where “on-the-ground” conservation actions can be implemented.

Incorporating climate change in marine use plans for British Columbia’s First Nations

Location

United States
51° 28' 31.4256" N, 127° 58' 7.5" W
US
Summary: 

The Marine Plan Partnership for the North Pacific Coast (MaPP) is a collaboration between British Columbia’s Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, and First Nations representing the Coastal First Nations-Great Bear Initiative, the North Coast-Skeena First Nations Stewardship Society, and the Nanwakolas Council. EcoAdapt partnered with MaPP in 2012-2015 to facilitate the integration of climate change into marine use plans for the four subregions: Haida Gwaii, North Coast, Central Coast, and North Vancouver Island.

Nantasket Beach: Special permits and incentives within a beach overlay district

Location

United States
42° 18' 6.2856" N, 70° 54' 23.2128" W
US
Organization: 
Summary: 

In 2013, the Town of Hull passed a zoning by-law creating a Nantasket Beach Overlay District to create a sustainable shoreline that allows for mixed-use development while protecting natural resources and coastal communities. The zoning by-law establishes the Planning Board as a Special Permit Granting Authority for the overlay district.

Maine’s Coastal Sand Dune Rules: Setting sea level rise estimates for planning

Location

United States
44° 8' 2.1408" N, 68° 23' 43.386" W
US
Summary: 

Maine’s Coastal Sand Dune Rules recognize uncertainty around rates of erosion and sea level rise, but also the need to act despite uncertainty. The rules define erosion hazard areas as any section of the coastal dune system that may become part of a coastal wetland over the next 100 years due to cumulative changes resulting from (1) historic long-term erosion, (2) short-term erosion from a 100-year storm, or (3) flooding during a 100-year storm combined with a two-foot rise in sea level.

Piloting a marine spatial planning approach in Scotland’s Orkney Islands

Location

United States
59° 7' 18.444" N, 2° 52' 2.7552" W
US
Organization: 
Summary: 

The Orkney Islands Council, Highland Council, and Marine Scotland partnered on a project to develop a marine spatial plan to guide development, activities, and decisions in Pentland Firth and Orkney Waters (PFOW). The region comprises the coastline of Orkney, Sule Skerry and Sule Stack, Stroma and the north coast of mainland Scotland from Duncansby Head to Cape Wrath. The region encompasses critical marine and coastal habitats, including seven European Areas of Conservation, 29 Sites of Special Scientific Interest, and three marine protected areas.

Cape Cod Regional Policy Plan: Integrating sea level rise into regional plans

Location

United States
41° 44' 49.8264" N, 70° 20' 43.6524" W
US
Organization: 
Summary: 

The Cape Cod Commission, established in 1990, is charged with furthering conservation, balanced economic growth, water quality protection, provision of adequate capital facilities, development of adequate fair affordable housing, and preservation of coastal resources and historical, cultural, archaeological, architectural, and recreational values. The Commission adopted a Regional Policy Plan in 1991 to guide land use throughout the county; the plan is reviewed and amended as needed at least every five years.

New York Ocean Action Plan: Managing coastal, marine, and land-based activities

Location

United States
40° 36' 13.6332" N, 73° 18' 2.8116" W
US
Summary: 

The New York Ocean Action Plan (OAP) is a collaborative effort to manage the state’s coastal, estuarine, and ocean waters, from New York City to Montauk Point out to the edge of the outer continental shelf. The geographic scope of the plan includes the estuarine waters of the Peconic Estuary, Hudson River Estuary, and NY/NJ Harbor Estuary, Long Island Sound, Great South Bay, Jamaica Bay, Moriches Bay, Hempstead Bay, and Shinnecock Bay. Four main goals guide the OAP’s priorities: