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Santa Monica Bay Restoration Plan Check-Up: Implementation Progress Update

Santa Monica Bay teems with life, serving as home to over 5000 species of birds, fish, mammals, plants and other wildlife and providing the two million-plus humans who live in its watershed with a mild climate, aesthetic beauty, recreation, food, fresh oxygen, and commercial opportunities. In December 1988, the State of California and the U.S.

Restoring Rocky Intertidal Habitats in Santa Monica Bay

The decline of flora and fauna of rocky intertidal habitats along wave-exposed coasts has been observed globally. Over the past ten years, researchers have showed links between organism population change and human visitation disturbance. The rocky intertidal zone in Los Angeles County, CA, is especially vulnerable to visitation disturbance due to its large human population coupled with the importance of the ocean as a recreation center.

Investigating Ocean Acidification in the Rocky Intertidal

The rocky intertidal zone, or the band of rocky coastline that is flooded by high tides and exposed during low tides, is home to a wealth of colorful seaweeds and uniquely adapted invertebrates. In Southern California, Cabrillo National Monument and Channel Islands National Park both protect rocky intertidal habitat to the delight of curious visitors young and old.

Puget Sound Feeder Bluffs: Coastal erosion as a sediment source and its implications for shoreline management

Beaches make up about 1400 miles of Puget Sound’s 2500-mile shoreline. They are an important component of the region’s coastal environment and support a broad range of ecological functions, from spawning habitat for forage fish to the formation of estuaries and salt marshes. These beaches are complex geological systems that respond to changes in the availability of sediment and its transport along the coast. On Puget Sound, some of the sand and gravel on the beaches may come from streams and rivers, but much of it is derived from erosion of coastal bluffs. 

Texas Fish and Game in a Changing Climate

Texas sportsmen and women know that the species they prize are highly attuned to climate. Climate change is already resulting in many changes that are being observed across land and water habitats, including changes in the types of fish, wildlife and plants, their population size, and shifts in where and when species are found. This publication describes some of the effects that have already been seen in Texas and what may be in store for the state's fish and game in the future.

Partnership for Adaptation Action

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Resilience Worldwide

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Adaptation Foresters, Inc.

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Just offshore of Northern California lies an underwater national park called the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. The Sanctuary is cared for and protected by NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The Greater Farallones Association supports the efforts of NOAA and the Sanctuary with citizen science programs, restoring critical habitat, addressing climate change, education for kids, and funding for noted researchers.

 

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