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A measurement framework to increase transparency in historic preservation decision-making under changing climate conditions

Today, cultural heritage planning and decision-making operate under considerable climate, political, and financial uncertainties and constraints. Consequently, decision-makers are often left making value-laden judgments of what to preserve, restore, and maintain in their best judgments, which can leave them open to criticism for not protecting the cultural resources most important to various and diverse stakeholder groups. Thus, a transparent and robust process to optimally maintain cultural heritage values for present and future generations is needed.

Climate Change and Adaptation; Options for the Management of Forests Under a Changing Climate

This presentation reviews approaches to adaptation, including short-term and long-term management options that reduce stressors and focus on enabling plants, animals and people to respond to climate influences. Challenges include a limited capacity to detect change, and societal challenge in prioritizing adaptation. The talk provides examples of climate adaptation strategies from several forests and locations, and tactical steps that managers can use to review, rank, resolve climate issues.

Climate Resilience Toolkit

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Meet the Challenges of a Changing Climate -  Find information and tools to help you understand and address your climate risks.

CASE STUDIES

Explore case studies to see how people are building resilience for their businesses and in their communities. Click dots on the map below to preview case studies, or browse all case studies by clicking the button below the map.

PREPdata

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The Partnership

The PREP Partnership brings together stakeholders from the public, private and nonprofit sectors, including government agencies, leading technology companies and networks of climate preparedness practitioners. The Partnership supports the adaptation planning community by:

Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal

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Simulations of future climate suggest profiles of temperature and precipitation may differ significantly from those in the past. Future changes in climate, specifically changes in temperature, and the type, timing, and distribution of precipitation may lead to changes in the hydrologic cycle. As such, natural resource managers are in need of tools that can provide estimates of key components of the hydrologic cycle, uncertainty associated with the estimates, and limitations associated with the climate data used to estimate these components. To help address this need, the U.S.

Hydrologic and Water Quality System (HAWQS)

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The Hydrologic and Water Quality System (HAWQS) is a web-based interactive water quantity and quality modeling system that employs as its core modeling engine the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), an internationally-recognized public domain model. HAWQS provides users with interactive web interfaces and maps; pre-loaded input data; outputs that include tables, charts, and raw output data; a user guide, and online development, execution, and storage of a user's modeling projects.

Historical Climate Trends

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The Historical Climate Trends product provides a comparative seasonal or annual analysis for a specified climate division or state. Long term averages are taken from NCDC's monthly and annual temperature and rainfall datasets. These long term averages are depicted in each chart as a horizontal line in the middle of the chart. 5-year moving averages of seasonal (or annual) values are plotted in comparison to the long-term average as red or blue curves for temperature and green or brown curves for precipitation.

Green Infrastructure Toolkit

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The purpose of this toolkit is to analyze common trends in the approaches various cities are taking to planning, implementing, and funding green infrastructure to manage stormwater. The toolkit is intended to aid local governments nationwide in comparing best practices across cities, drawing lessons from different approaches, and crafting similar policies for their own jurisdictions.