Assessing potential winter weather response to climate change and implications for tourism in the U.S. Great Lakes and Midwest

Study Region

Eight U.S. states bordering the North American Laurentian Great Lakes.

Study Focus

Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model simulations, based on data from an ensemble of atmospheric-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) used for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC's) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), were used to quantify potential climate change impacts on winter weather and hydrology in the study region and understand implications for its tourism sector.

New Hydrologic Insights for the Region

Climate Change Adaptation Strategies and Approaches for Outdoor Recreation

Climate change will alter opportunities and demand for outdoor recreation through altered winter weather conditions and season length, climate-driven changes in user preferences, and damage to recreational infrastructure, among other factors. To ensure that outdoor recreation remains sustainable in the face of these challenges, natural resource managers may need to adapt their recreation management. One of the major challenges of adapting recreation to climate change is translating broad concepts into specific, tangible actions.

Defining Vulnerable Communities in the Context of Climate Adaptation

The Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resiliency Program (ICARP) was established by Senate Bill 246. Through its activities, the Program aims to develop holistic strategies to coordinate climate activities at the state, regional, and local levels. One of the Program’s main components is the Technical Advisory Council (TAC), which brings together state and local government, non-profit and private sector practitioners, scientists, and community leaders to help coordinate activities that better prepare California for the impacts of a changing climate.

Climate Change and Extreme Weather Adaptation Options for Transportation Assets in the Bay Area Pilot Project

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC), the California Department of Transportation, District 4 (Caltrans) and San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District (BART) have partnered on a collaborative sub-regional pilot project to assess adaptation options for a subset of key transportation assets vulnerable to sea level rise (SLR) in Alameda County.

Sacramento Region Transportation Climate Adaptation Plan

Many state, regional, and local governments are beginning to explore how potential climate change impacts could affect their natural and man-made resources. Damage to transportation infrastructure from extreme weather events can be physically and fiscally difficult to repair. This plan outlines key strategies and actions the Sacramento region can take to ensure its transportation assets are adaptable to potential climate related events.

Mapping Resilience: A Blueprint for Thriving in the Face of Climate Disaster

There is a need to better characterize and promote the notion of community resilience as part of broader adaptation strategies toward a vision that is deeply rooted in climate justice and equity. Various sectors are already implementing climate adaptation programs, but these efforts are often siloed and focus on protecting natural resources or built infrastructure.

Optimizing historic preservation under climate change: Decision support for cultural resource adaptation planning in national parks

Climate change poses great challenges for cultural resource management, particularly in coastal areas. Cultural resources, such as historic buildings, in coastal areas are vulnerable to climate impacts including inundation, deterioration, and destruction from sea-level rise and storm-related flooding and erosion. However, research that assesses the trade-offs between actions for protecting vulnerable and valuable cultural resources under budgetary constraints is limited.

Assessing the Impacts of Coastal Flooding on Treaty of Olympia Infrastructure

Extreme coastal total water levels (TWLs) that result in flooding are the result of the complex interactions between multiple oceanographic, hydrological, geological, and meteorological forcings that act over a wide range of scales (i.e., astronomical tide, wave set-up, wind set-up, large-scale storm surge, precipitation, fluvial discharges, monthly mean sea level, vertical land motions, etc.). Coastal flooding that occurs during extreme TWLs can significantly impact communities and infrastructure resulting in substantial economic losses, even threatening human lives.

Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for the Treaty of Olympia Tribes

Extreme coastal total water levels (TWLs) that result in flooding are the result of the complex interactions between multiple oceanographic, hydrological, geological, and meteorological forcings that act over a wide range of scales (i.e., astronomical tide, wave set-up, wind set-up, large-scale storm surge, precipitation, fluvial discharges, monthly mean sea level, vertical land motions, etc.). Coastal flooding that occurs during extreme TWLs can significantly impact communities and infrastructure resulting in substantial economic losses, even threatening human lives.