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Resilience Strategies for Power Outages

A warming atmosphere is giving extra energy to storms, making the hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms of today more intense than those of the past. This trend is projected to accelerate in the years to come. These stronger storms are more likely to cause power outages, and the loss of power can be costly in terms of lives lost, economic impact, and public health. This fact sheet outlines strategies that local governments could implement to reduce the frequency and duration of power outages and help communities better withstand them when they do occur.

Sea Level Rise Adaptation Guide for Virginia Localities

Tool Overview: 

This is a Virginia-specific, web-based adaptation resource geared towards informing local government staff on the range of strategies available to combat sea level rise and recurrent flooding. The 'Adaptation Guide' is not a traditional report, but instead presents information in an abbreviated format. Each strategy has its own corresponding web page that highlights feedback from local government staff interviews, funding sources, Virginia case studies, sample ordinance language, and potential CRS credit.

Rhode Island's STORMTOOLS

Tool Overview: 

STORMTOOLS is a method to illustrate and display storm inundation, with and without sea level rise, for different types of storms that could occur along Rhode Island’s coastline. Projections are provided that show water extent and depth at any given point for nuisance floods (1, 3, 5, and 10 yr recurrence intervals) and the 25, 50, 100, and 500 year storm scenarios at the 95% confidence interval. Sea level rise of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 feet on their own as well as combined with each storm scenario are also modeled.

Climate Change Adaptation Certification Tool

Tool Overview: 

Climate Change Adaptation Certification Tool: Moving Communities from Planning to Implementation

The Climate Change Adaptation Certification Tool was developed to support communities beyond planning—helping them implement their updated Comprehensive Plan. Using this 3-step CCAC tool for rapid implementation of climate savvy planning goals and policies will enable community services, infrastructure, ecosystems and economies to better anticipate and respond to the effects of climate change. 

Low Carbon Resilience: Best Practices For Professionals

As the 2018 IPCC Special Report makes clear, the need to advance mitigation and adaptation is now more urgent than ever before; moreover, integrating the two streams of action in research and practice via what we call “low carbon resilience” (LCR) policy, planning, and development approaches is potentially more efficient and effective than the current, largely siloed approach. This project focused on the key role professionals play as change agents in climate action, and what is needed for all sectors to advance uptake of LCR-based practices.

Using Legal Tools to Protect Lakes and Rivers from Climate Impacts

Lake Champlain has a pollution problem. The lake—situated between the Green Mountains of Vermont and the Adirondack Mountains of New York—suffers from problematic blue-green algae blooms (also known as “pond scum”). When environmental conditions are just right— warm, slow-moving water enriched with nutrients like phosphorous or nitrogen—blue-green algae can grow fast, creating scum layers or floating mats. These blooms, in addition to being unsightly, are dangerous to human, fish, and wildlife health.

Brief: Resilience Strategies for Power Outages

A warming atmosphere is giving extra energy to storms, making the hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms of today more intense than those of the past. This trend is projected to accelerate in the years to come. These stronger storms are more likely to cause power outages, and the loss of power can be costly in terms of lives lost, economic impact, and public health. This fact sheet outlines strategies that local governments could implement to reduce the frequency and duration of power outages and help communities better withstand them when they do occur.

Brief: Resilience Strategies for Drought

Across the United States, the risk of drought is expected to grow due to reduced precipitation and higher temperatures caused by climate change. Drought’s far-reaching impacts can ripple through communities, regions, watersheds, economies and ecosystems. This fact sheet overviews strategies for areas with a projected increase in drought conditions to become more resilient. It concludes with a community case study that has used a number of these strategies, and a list of tools to help communities evaluate the costs and benefits of resilience strategies.

Brief: Resilience Strategies for Flash Flooding

The United States is facing increasingly frequent and intense precipitation events and ever higher damages from flooding each year due to climate change and urbanization. Communities, counties, and states are responding by upgrading stormwater and sewage systems with a growing emphasis on strategies to become more resilient to flooding. This paper outlines resilience strategies for flash flooding, with an emphasis on riverine and precipitation-caused flooding. For each strategy, the paper will discuss primary and co-benefits, and associated costs.