Waveland (the Land of the Waves) was originally part of old Shieldsboro (now Bay St. Louis​) and was known as Montgomery Station and Grand Bend before applying for, and being granted, a special charter to become a separate municipality with a Mayor and ​Board of Aldermen in 1888.

Waggonner & Ball Architects is a broad based architectural and planning firm with over 30 years of experience on a wide range of architectural and planning projects. Located in the historic Garden District of New Orleans, the firm has created award winning educational, retail, office, religious, government, and residential architecture, as well as planning and urban design projects.

MSD protects our community’s overall health and safety by providing clean waterways and by managing flood and drainage issues—24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

This is the job of about 600 MSD employees across the 376 square miles of the Louisville Metro* area. While we operate and maintain Louisville Metro’s sewer and floodwall systems, water quality treatment centers and flood pumping stations, MSD also invests in hundreds of infrastructure improvement projects each year and plants more than 1,000 trees and other plants to enhance water filtration and reduce runoff.

We are citizens, businesses, schools and government working together to restore our home river. For too long, the Elizabeth River, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, has been infamous for pollution. Instead of lamenting the problem, we prefer to take hope from her strengths. From the Great Bridge Lock to the naval base, you can see the importance of the Elizabeth River every day in Hampton Roads. She gives us our work and our play.

The Water Resources Department is committed to:

The Tennessee Unit is currently staffed by a Unit Leader, an Assistant Unit Leader, one research technician, and a secretary. Normally, 5-10 MS and PhD graduate students are supported by a variety of funded research projects dealing with the study of fish and mussels. The Tennessee Unit has a very close working relationship on the campus of Tennessee Tech with the Biology Department and the Center for the Management, Protection, and Utilization of Water Resources (Water Center).

Coastal Hazard Wheel

Tool Overview: 

The Coastal Hazard Wheel is a universal coastal adaptation system to address all coastal challenges simultaneously. It can be used as a complete coastal language and aims to boost adaptation action and bridge the gap between scientists, policy-makers and the general public. It is based on a new coastal classification system and functions as a key for classifying a particular coastal location, determining its hazard profile, identifying relevant management options and communicating coastal information.

Southeastern Connecticut Regional Resilience Vision Project

Location

New Haven
55 Church Street Floor 3
06510 New Haven , CT
United States
41° 18' 18.2736" N, 72° 55' 34.7304" W
Connecticut US
Organization: 
The Nature Conservancy
Organization: 
Summary: 

In the fall of 2016, a partnership between The Nature Conservancy, the Southeastern Connecticut Council of Governments, and the Southeastern Connecticut Enterprise Region convened a group of over fifty stakeholders from Southeastern Connecticut to discuss the impacts of rising sea levels, extreme weather, and changing social and economic conditions on the resilience of the region and its communities.

Community Resilience Building Workshop Guide

The need for municipalities, corporations, organizations, and government agencies to build community resilience and adapt to extreme weather and climate is now strikingly evident. Ongoing events continuously reinforce this urgency and compel leading communities to proactively plan and act.  In response to this ever increasing need and urgency, the Community Resilience Building Workshop was created.    

The Community Resilience Building Workshop is a unique, “anywhere at any scale,” community-driven process, rich with information, experience, and dialogue, where participants identify top hazards, current challenges, strengths, and priority actions to equitably improve community resilience to all natural and climate-related hazards today, and in the future.  After a decade in development, the CRB Workshop has been tried, tested and is now trusted by over forty five communities in Connecticut, New York, and most recently Minnesota.

The CRB Workshop Guidebook provides clear instructions on how to lead your community towards resilience. The Guidebook carefully illustrates the essentials of the process as well as the “before” and “after” workshop steps to help ensure immediate goals, outcomes, and strategic direction are realized within your community.

Quantifying the Success of Buyout Programs: A Staten Island Case Study

Location

Staten Island 10306 Staten Island , NY
United States
40° 34' 22.5624" N, 74° 7' 47.5248" W
New York US
Organization: 
Duke University
Summary: 

An increasingly common post-disaster mitigation approach, home buyout programs are generally intended to reduce vulnerability to future disasters. However, to date, there has been virtually no quantitative evaluation of whether or not coastal buyout programs are successful in reducing vulnerability. Through a change in vulnerability analysis, this study quantifies the success of the Staten Island buyout program in reducing the nationwide vulnerability of people and property to coastal flood hazards.