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Brief: Resilience Strategies for Power Outages

A warming atmosphere is giving extra energy to storms, making the hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms of today more intense than those of the past. This trend is projected to accelerate in the years to come. These stronger storms are more likely to cause power outages, and the loss of power can be costly in terms of lives lost, economic impact, and public health. This fact sheet outlines strategies that local governments could implement to reduce the frequency and duration of power outages and help communities better withstand them when they do occur.

Brief: Resilience Strategies for Drought

Across the United States, the risk of drought is expected to grow due to reduced precipitation and higher temperatures caused by climate change. Drought’s far-reaching impacts can ripple through communities, regions, watersheds, economies and ecosystems. This fact sheet overviews strategies for areas with a projected increase in drought conditions to become more resilient. It concludes with a community case study that has used a number of these strategies, and a list of tools to help communities evaluate the costs and benefits of resilience strategies.

Brief: Resilience Strategies for Flash Flooding

The United States is facing increasingly frequent and intense precipitation events and ever higher damages from flooding each year due to climate change and urbanization. Communities, counties, and states are responding by upgrading stormwater and sewage systems with a growing emphasis on strategies to become more resilient to flooding. This paper outlines resilience strategies for flash flooding, with an emphasis on riverine and precipitation-caused flooding. For each strategy, the paper will discuss primary and co-benefits, and associated costs.

Brief: Resilience Strategies for Wildfire

The risk of wildfire is expected to grow across the United States due to reduced precipitation in some regions, and higher temperatures caused by climate change. Wildfire has far-reaching impacts that can ripple through communities, regions, watersheds, and ecosystems. This paper overviews a number of adaptation strategies for areas with a projected increase in wildfire conditions. For each strategy, it will discuss design and operation costs, and primary and co-benefits.

Indiana Dunes Climate Change Adaptation Plan

The Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore is one of the most floristically rich U.S. national parks, situated within a narrow band at the southern tip of Lake Michigan. Embedded within this unique national park is the Indiana Dunes State Park, which consists of 2,182 acres of similar primitive and exceptional landscape. A wide range of habitats and plant species are found in these parks, where a dune and swale succession progresses from the shore inland and habitats include abundant plant species, from boreal and prairie to Eastern deciduous forest.

Informing Plans for Managing Resources of Cape Lookout National Seashore under Projected Climate Change, Sea Level Rise, and Associated Impacts: Cultural Resource Management and Historic Preservation Experts Survey Results

This report contributes to a relatively new body of research by exploring three important but understudied challenges of cultural resources climate change adaptation: (1) barriers to current cultural resource management and historic preservation given climate change impacts together with needs for overcoming the identified barriers; (2) the importance of factors influencing climate adaptation prioritization; (3) the potential utility of a geovisualization decision support to provide site managers with experts’ recommendations for adaptation.