Community Based Public-Private Partnerships (CBP3s) and Alternative Market-Based Tools for Integrated Green Stormwater Infrastructure

Public Private Partnerships (P3s) have the potential to help many communities optimize their limited resources through agreements with private parties to help build and maintain their public infrastructure. P3s have successfully designed, built, and maintained many types of public infrastructure, such as roads, and drinking water/wastewater utilities across the U.S. Until recently, there have been no P3s specifically developed for stormwater management or Clean Water Act requirements. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 3 Water Protection Division (WPD) has been researching, benchmarking, and evaluating P3s for their potential adaptation and use in the Chesapeake Bay region. On December 6, 2012, the EPA Region 3 WPD hosted a P3 Experts Roundtable in Philadelphia, PA (U.S. EPA, 2013a). The goal of the P3 Roundtable was to provide a forum for a targeted group of private sector representatives to discuss in detail the feasibility, practicality, and benefits of using P3s to assist jurisdictions in the finance, design, construction, and O&M of an urban stormwater retrofit program. The results of this Roundtable are the foundation and approach for applying a stormwater P3 model across the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

This guide will provide communities with an opportunity to review the capacity and potential to develop a P3 program to help “close the gap” between current resources and the funding that will be required to meet stormwater regulatory commitments and community stormwater management needs. In addition, this guide and the tools presented are a continuing effort, commitment, and partnership between EPA Region 3 and communities in the Chesapeake Bay region. We believe it will help to raise the bar and further advance the restoration goals and objectives for the Chesapeake Bay.

Colorado Climate Vulnerability Study

Colorado’s climate has warmed in recent decades, and climate models unanimously project this warming trend will continue into the future. Climate change has and will continue to impact the state’s resources in a variety of ways, including more rapid snowmelt, longer and more severe droughts, and longer growing seasons. Moreover, Colorado experiences numerous climate- related disasters, such as oods, droughts, and wild res, which will continue to occur in the future and pose serious hazards to public safety and the economy, regardless of the rate at which the climate warms.

During its 2013 session, the Colorado Legislature passed HB13-1293, which declared that “climate change presents serious, diverse, and ongoing issues for the state’s people, economy, and environment.” Among other provisions, the bill required the governor to submit an annual report to a number of commi ees within the legislature “on climate change issues generally, the current climate action plan...and the speci c ways in which climate change a ects the state.”

The Colorado Energy Office commissioned the University of Colorado Boulder and Colorado State University to assemble a team of Colorado- based experts to complete this study, as one initial step in a multi-agency response to the requirements of HB 13-1293. The Colorado Climate Change Vulnerability Study provides an overview of key vulnerabilities that climate variability and change will pose for Colorado’s economy and resources. The purpose of the study is to provide state agencies, local governments, and others with background for preparedness planning.

EPA Financing Green Infrastructure: A Best Practices Guide for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund

Since 1988, EPA’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) has established itself as an important source of affordable funding for infrastructure projects that improve and maintain the quality of our nation’s waters. Each of the 51 programs operating independently across the United States and Puerto Rico demonstrate the power of federal and state partnerships to leverage financial resources in the interest of building sustainable infrastructure and protecting public health and water quality. There is no single prescription for accomplishing these goals; infrastructure solutions must be tailored to meet the environmental and economic needs of individual communities. States have significant flexibility within the CWSRF to establish their own funding priorities, assist communities of all sizes, and address a wide range of water quality concerns.

This best practices guide illustrates a variety of incentives states use to encourage consideration and implementation of green infrastructure and foster sustainability within their programs. Some of the incentives and examples featured in the guide are not specific to green infrastructure, but could easily be adapted to focus on green infrastructure implementation. Likewise, many of the practices that are specific to green infrastructure can also be applied to other sustainable projects such as water and energy efficiency. State programs have used the practices in this guide with great success. EPA is pleased to highlight these efforts in the hope that other interested programs can follow their example.

The Alliance for Water Efficiency is a stakeholder-based nonprofit organization dedicated to the efficient and sustainable use of water. Headquartered in Chicago, the Alliance serves as a North American advocate for water efficient products and programs, and provides information and assistance on water conservation efforts. A diverse Board of Directors governs the organization and has adopted a set of guiding principles and strategic plan.

Drought Management Database

Tool Overview: 

The Drought Management Database collects and provides examples of how different U.S. regions and sectors are responding to and mitigating drought. This online database can be useful for various levels of government looking to engage in drought preparedness and response planning, as well as for sectoral decision makers looking to undertake similar planning efforts, as it provides real-world examples and lessons learned.

Drought Impact Reporter

Tool Overview: 

The Drought Impact Reporter is an online database that maps recorded drought impacts in the United States. The Drought Impact Reporter defines a drought impact as “an observable loss or change that occurred at a specific place or time because of drought.” The reporter maps the number of drought-related impacts down to the county level, and provides critical information detailing type, location, and extent of drought impact, along with relevant source information.

Coastal Flood Exposure Mapper

Tool Overview: 

The Coastal Flood Exposure Mapper helps communities understand their risks and vulnerability to coastal flooding. The mapper was first developed following Hurricane Sandy to provide a tool to show areas susceptible to coastal flooding, storm surge, and inundation, and to inform communities and local authorities about the risks their communities face. Users are able to explore maps that show how natural resources, communities, and infrastructure and development will be exposed to coastal flooding hazards.

Coastal County Snapshots

Tool Overview: 

Coastal County Snapshots is an online tool that produces user-friendly reports identifying and describing three categories of coastal hazards and change — flooding risk, wetland impacts, and ocean jobs impact — for selected coastal counties in the United States. Users select a coastal county, and the tool generates reports for the three categories identifying and describing changes that have occurred (e.g., changes in land cover, job trends) and important sectoral information (e.g., amount of coastal infrastructure at risk from flooding, how wetlands can be used to reduce flood impacts).

Tool Description: 

Land managers, natural resource managers, local authorities, planners, engineers, scientists, community members

Position Title: 
Senior Associate
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Position Title: 
Executive Coordinator
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