SECAS is a regional conservation initiative that spans the Southeastern United States and Caribbean. SECAS was started in 2011 by the states of the Southeastern Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies and the federal agencies of the Southeast Natural Resource Leaders Group. 

SECAS brings together state and federal agencies, nonprofit organizations, private businesses, tribes, partnerships, and universities around a shared vision of the future. We’re working to design and achieve a connected network of lands and waters to benefit ecosystems, species, and people.

Surprisingly malleable public preferences for climate adaptation in forests

Researchers and policy-makers often assume that public preferences for climate change adaptation are positive and stable compared to those of mitigation. However, public judgments about adaptation in natural resource sectors (like forestry) require that people make difficult, value-laden and uncertain trade-offs across complex social-ecological systems. The deliberative methods (e.g.

Anchorage Climate Action Plan

The Anchorage Climate Action Plan puts Anchorage on a path to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80% from 2008 levels by 2050, with an interim goal of 40% by 2030.*,1,2 Many of the actions in this plan are focused on addressing the primary cause of climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, Anchorage residents are already experiencing many initial impacts of climate change, including warmer winters, icier roads, and more winter rain. The Climate Action Plan includes actions that will help Anchorage prepare for these and future impacts. 

NRCS Climate Brochures

The USDA Northern Forests Climate Hub and the Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science (NIACS) have partnered with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to develop a series of brochures that describe options landowners and land managers have to adapt to climate change. The brochures describe how NRCS programs and practices can help landowners achieve their goals while supporting climate adaptation.

Outdoor Recreation Climate Change Adaptation Strategies and Approaches

Climate change will alter opportunities and demand for outdoor recreation through altered winter weather conditions and season length, climate-driven changes in user preferences, and damage to recreational infrastructure, among other factors. To ensure that outdoor recreation remains sustainable in the face of these challenges, natural resource managers may need to adapt their recreation management. One of the major challenges of adapting recreation to climate change is translating broad concepts into specific, tangible actions.

Forest Management for Carbon Sequestration and Climate Adaptation

The importance of forests for sequestering carbon has created widespread interest among land managers for identifying actions that maintain or enhance carbon storage in forests. Managing for forest carbon under changing climatic conditions underscores a need for resources that help identify adaptation actions that align with carbon management. We developed the Forest Carbon Management Menu to help translate broad carbon management concepts into actionable tactics that help managers reduce risk from expected climate impacts in order to meet desired management goals.

Climate and Health Action Guide

Tool Overview

This action guide is designed to help you promote human health and climate benefits of urban forests in your community while minimizing risks from climate change, such as sea level rise and more frequent and extreme weather events. It outlines a process for you to create an urban forestry project to optimize for climate and health outcomes. The guide will help you reduce climate risks and proactively respond to changing conditions while also providing important benefits to the health and well-being of your community.

Vulnerability Assessment of Austin’s Urban Forest and Natural Areas

The trees, developed green spaces, and natural areas within the City of Austin’s 400,882 acres will face direct and indirect impacts from a changing climate over the 21st century. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of urban trees and natural and developed landscapes within the City Austin to a range of future climates. We synthesized and summarized information on the contemporary landscape, provided information on past climate trends, and illustrated a range of projected future climates. We used this information to inform models of habitat suitability for trees native to the area.