Climate Change and Adaptation; Options for the Management of Forests Under a Changing Climate

This presentation reviews approaches to adaptation, including short-term and long-term management options that reduce stressors and focus on enabling plants, animals and people to respond to climate influences. Challenges include a limited capacity to detect change, and societal challenge in prioritizing adaptation. The talk provides examples of climate adaptation strategies from several forests and locations, and tactical steps that managers can use to review, rank, resolve climate issues.

Incorporating Sea Level Change Scenarios at the Local Level

Just as ooding threats need to be factored into coastal community planning initiatives, so too should sea level change. Unfortunately, the “one size ts all” approach does not work.

The level of uncertainty represented in sea level projections is one challenge. Furthermore, universal projections can’t be uniformly applied to all communities because of the many local variables. These variables include subsidence or uplift, and changes in estuarine and shelf hydrodynamics, regional oceanographic circulation patterns, and river ows. Local calculations are needed.

Then add in the local response, where many variables come into play as well. Even if two communities have similar projection numbers, their responses are likely to be widely di erent because of the external factors speci c to their locations that must be considered, such as anticipated local risk, community will, and the type of planning process in which the numbers will be used.

Incorporating sea level change into planning processes involves more than selecting a number. That is why this document advocates the scenario approach.

Using the information provided here, communities can develop a process that incorporates a range of possibilities and factors. With this information various scenarios can be developed, both in terms of projections and responses, to meet the speci c circumstances of a community. Moreover, working through the scenario development process provides the data and information that o cials will need to make communities readily adaptable to changing circumstances. 

 

Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal

Tool Overview: 

Simulations of future climate suggest profiles of temperature and precipitation may differ significantly from those in the past. Future changes in climate, specifically changes in temperature, and the type, timing, and distribution of precipitation may lead to changes in the hydrologic cycle. As such, natural resource managers are in need of tools that can provide estimates of key components of the hydrologic cycle, uncertainty associated with the estimates, and limitations associated with the climate data used to estimate these components. To help address this need, the U.S.

Hydrologic and Water Quality System (HAWQS)

Tool Overview: 

The Hydrologic and Water Quality System (HAWQS) is a web-based interactive water quantity and quality modeling system that employs as its core modeling engine the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), an internationally-recognized public domain model. HAWQS provides users with interactive web interfaces and maps; pre-loaded input data; outputs that include tables, charts, and raw output data; a user guide, and online development, execution, and storage of a user's modeling projects.

Massachusetts Climate Action Tool

Location

MA
United States
42° 27' 45.5112" N, 72° 27' 30.5856" W
Massachusetts US
Tool Overview: 

The Massachusetts Wildlife Climate Action Tool is designed to inform and inspire local action to protect the Commonwealth’s natural resources in a changing climate. It was developed for local decision-makers, conservation practitioners, large landowners, and community leaders across the state. 

With this tool, you can:

Naturally Resilient Communities

Tool Overview: 

Nature offers a powerful set of tools for addressing hazards like flooding and erosion. Nature-based solutions use natural systems, mimic natural processes, or work in tandem with traditional approaches to address these specific hazards. Communities across the country— along rivers or coasts, large or small, rural or urban— can incorporate nature-based solutions in local planning, zoning, regulations, and built projects to help reduce their exposure to flood and erosion impacts.

HEALTHIER ENVIRONMENTS

Green Infrastructure Toolkit

Tool Overview: 

The purpose of this toolkit is to analyze common trends in the approaches various cities are taking to planning, implementing, and funding green infrastructure to manage stormwater. The toolkit is intended to aid local governments nationwide in comparing best practices across cities, drawing lessons from different approaches, and crafting similar policies for their own jurisdictions.

Climate Smart Cities™

Tool Overview: 

Cities are on the front line of climate change. They can be an important part of the solution by offering energy-efficient living for our growing population—but they must also face the growing threat of heat waves and flooding. Our Climate-Smart Cities program helps cities nationwide create parks and conserve land to meet the climate challenge.

We help cities use parks and natural lands as “green infrastructure” serving four objectives:

Elephant Builder

Tool Overview: 

The Elephant Builder system-mapping process helps policymakers, scientists, and citizens integrate their very different expertise into a shared map of the effects of climate change and discover novel adaptation solutions. Policy-makers, domain experts, and members of underrepresented groups—addresses a series of concrete questions tailored to their own expertise.

Climate Change Resilience Roadmap

Tool Overview: 

To mitigate hazards and risks, the Resilience Roadmap offers comprehensive guidance for federal, state, and local entities to effectively convene at the regional level for adaptable and holistic planning. This multi-jurisdictional approach requires major cooperation across boundaries, considerable reliance on partnerships and multi-agency collaborations, and significant utilization of interdisciplinary teams.

Step-by-Step Process

To constructively lead intergovernmental planning efforts with tangible outputs, follow these steps in order: