Southern California Chaparral Habitats - Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Summary

This document represents an initial evaluation of vulnerability for chaparral habitats based on expert input and existing information. Specifically, the information presented below comprises habitat expert vulnerability assessment survey results and comments, peer-review comments and revisions, and relevant references from the literature. The aim of this document is to expand understanding of habitat vulnerability to changing climate conditions, and to provide a foundation for developing appropriate adaptation responses. 

View the longer techincal synthesis here

 

Southern California Alluvial Scrub Habitats - Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Summary

This document represents an initial evaluation of vulnerability for alluvial scrub habitats based on expert input and existing information. Specifically, the information presented below comprises habitat expert vulnerability assessment survey results and comments, peer-review comments and revisions, and relevant references from the literature. The aim of this document is to expand understanding of habitat vulnerability to changing climate conditions, and to provide a foundation for developing appropriate adaptation responses. 

View the longer technical synthesis here

Assessing Historical Significance and Use Potential of Buildings within Historic Districts: An Overview of a Measurement Framework Developed for Climate Adaptation Planning

The tool (framework) is intended to help managers deal with one aspect of historic preservation planning efforts: evaluating and assessing the relative historical significance and use potential of historic buildings. In this publication we (1) present an overview of the process we used to develop the measurement framework and (2) describe how the framework can be used as a guide for measuring the historical significance and use potential of buildings.

Ongoing collaboration with USGS researchers will further result in a decision support tool that combines the data from this framework with (1) data on the vulnerability of the buildings to future flooding from storm surge and sea level rise and (2) cost estimates for different types of adaptation strategies (such as elevating or moving buildings). Ultimately, the combined efforts can inform climate change planning efforts that seek to maximize cultural heritage preservation.

Climate Change and Extreme Weather Vulnerability Assessment Framework

Tool Overview: 

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA's) Climate Change & Extreme Weather Vulnerability Assessment Framework is a guide and collection of resources for use in analyzing the impacts of climate change and extreme weather on transportation infrastructure. Its purpose is to identify key considerations, questions, and resources that can be used to design and implement a climate change vulnerability assessment.

CMIP Climate Data Processing Tool

Tool Overview: 

The purpose of the U.S. Department of Transportation's Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) Climate Data Processing Tool is to process readily available downscaled climate data at the local level into relevant statistics for transportation planners. This tool works with data used by the Downscaled CMIP3 and CMIP5 Climate and Hydrology Projections (DCHP) website. This website houses climate model data from phase 3 (CMIP3) and phase 5 (CMIP5) of the World Climate Research Programme.

The Pacific Southwest Region of the US Forest Service manages 20 million acres of National Forest land in California and assists the State and Private forest landowners in California, Hawaii and the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands. Eighteen national forests are located in this region. The Pacific Southwest Region is commonly referred to as Region 5 (R5).

Engaging Partners in an All Lands Approach

Southern California Climate Adaptation Project

Location

CA
United States
34° 21' 19.0908" N, 116° 54' 41.9544" W
California US
Summary: 

The Southern California Climate Adaptation Project was initiated to improve understanding about the vulnerability of important southern California habitats to climate change and to develop adaptation strategies designed to reduce vulnerabilities and/or increase resilience of habitats. This project used a collaborative, stakeholder-driven process that involved soliciting input from land and resource managers, conservation practitioners, scientists, and others from federal and state agencies, universities, and nongovernmental organizations.

Metro-Boston Regional Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

The primary purpose of this Strategy is to outline specific sub-strategies and recommendations to fulfill the stated adaptation goal and associated objectives (explained in Section 2). The overarching public purpose of the Strategy is to reduce the impacts of climate change through effective risk management. The Strategy is intended as a proactive approach in response to the findings of the vulnerability assessment conducted for the Metro-Boston Region. A primary planning recommendation of the Strategy is the integration of information about emerging climate change risks into current disaster planning systems and arrangements at the community and/or regional level, as appropriate. Such a strategy is urgently needed because any increase in the number or intensity of disasters due to climate change will adversely impact quality of life and economic development in the region. Ideally, the Strategy can significantly limit the adverse effect of climatic hazards on public health and safety, critical infrastructure and the built environment, and the region’s natural resources and ecosystems. This in turn will reduce the disruption of the local economy and lessen the costs of post-disaster response.

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Position Title: 
Senior Environmental Planner

Our world is in peril. Global warming, climate change, and alterations to land, water and air all threaten human and environmental welfare. The problems are urgent and solutions are needed now. At the Environmental Change Initiative (ND-ECI), over 50 researchers have come together from almost every discipline to find these solutions. We work hand-in-hand with partners to do research that matters to society, answering the most critical environmental questions of our time:

We call it “Science Serving Society”