Climate Change Influences on Environment as a Determinant of Indigenous Health: Relationships to Place, Sea Ice, and Health in an Inuit Community

This paper contributes to the literature on Indigenous health, human dimensions of climate change, and place-based dimensions of health by examining the role of environment for Inuit health in the context of a changing climate. We investigated the relationship between one key element of the environment – sea ice – and diverse aspects of health in an Inuit community in northern Canada, drawing on population health and health geography approaches. We used a case study design and participatory and collaborative approach with the community of Nain in northern Labrador, Canada.

The 1854 Treaty Authority is an inter-tribal natural resource management organization that protects and implements the off-reservation hunting, fishing and gathering rights for the Grand Portage and Bois Forte bands in the lands ceded to the United States government under the Treaty of La Pointe, 1854.

FACING THE STORM : Indian Tribes, Climate-Induced Weather Extremes, and the Future for Indian Country

As sovereign nations, Indian Tribes consistently strive to fully exercise their right of self-determination and to maintain their cultural identity, often in the face of the severe economic, societal, and environmental challenges confronting them. Their sovereignty, cultures, and ways of life are profoundly tested in these times by the added challenge of climate change.

Barriers to Climate Change Adaptation in Indigenous Communities: A Case Study on the Mohawk Community of Kanesatake, Canada

The switch from climate change mitigation to the adaptation to its impacts or effects initially appears to be a promising strategy. Academics and practitioners, however, confront limits and barriers to the adaptation both in theory and practice. Despite the extensive efforts in understanding limits and barriers, little is still known about political and institutional barriers, more specifically political challenges in Indigenous communities that typically nullify the effect of adaptation strategies.

Pala Band of Mission Indians Climate Change Adaptation Plan

This report synthesizes and presents the results of a planning process designed to help the Pala Band of Mission Indians more proactively prepare for and adapt to the impacts of climate change. Prior to this report, Pala assessed its vulnerability to climate change, which was summarized in its Vulnerability Assessment. The Vulnerability Assessment concluded thatelevated temperature, wildfire, storms and flooding, and drought present high-risk climate change exposures for Pala.

Pala Band of Mission Indians Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment

The Pala Band of Mission Indians has assessed its vulnerability to climate change, which is summarized in this report. Climate change refers to long-term changes in usual or expected weather patterns resulting from an increase in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. To determine Pala’s climate change vulnerability, this process entailed review of literature, data, staff knowledge, and community observations to determine to what extent Pala may be exposed to various climate changes now and in the future.

Founded in 2005, the Alaska Institute for Justice is the only agency in Alaska dedicated to protecting the human rights of immigrants and refugees. Based in Anchorage and Juneau, our staff provides statewide comprehensive immigration legal services, as well as language interpretation and translation services throughout Alaska. Collectively, AIJ Board and Staff have more than 25 years of legal experience serving Alaska’s immigrants and refugees.

Position: Co-Founder & Director
Position: Climate Adaptation Consultant