Assessing the Impacts of Coastal Flooding on Treaty of Olympia Infrastructure

Extreme coastal total water levels (TWLs) that result in flooding are the result of the complex interactions between multiple oceanographic, hydrological, geological, and meteorological forcings that act over a wide range of scales (i.e., astronomical tide, wave set-up, wind set-up, large-scale storm surge, precipitation, fluvial discharges, monthly mean sea level, vertical land motions, etc.). Coastal flooding that occurs during extreme TWLs can significantly impact communities and infrastructure resulting in substantial economic losses, even threatening human lives.

Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for the Treaty of Olympia Tribes

Extreme coastal total water levels (TWLs) that result in flooding are the result of the complex interactions between multiple oceanographic, hydrological, geological, and meteorological forcings that act over a wide range of scales (i.e., astronomical tide, wave set-up, wind set-up, large-scale storm surge, precipitation, fluvial discharges, monthly mean sea level, vertical land motions, etc.). Coastal flooding that occurs during extreme TWLs can significantly impact communities and infrastructure resulting in substantial economic losses, even threatening human lives.

Position: Research Associate

Understanding Rural Attitudes Toward the Environment and Conservation in America

Rural Americans matter—a lot—to the fate of U.S. environmental policy. Not only do farmers, ranchers, and forest owners manage huge portions of American lands and watersheds, but rural voters also have an outsized impact on national policy. While rural Americans express support for natural resource conservation, they and their elected officials often voice less support for existing federal environmental policies and laws. Congressional action on a variety of environmental issues has been impeded by opposition from rural stakeholders.

National Center for Appropriate Technology

The National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) has been promoting sustainable living for over 40 years. Established in 1976, we are a national nonprofit that helps people by championing small-scale, local, and sustainable solutions to reduce poverty, promote healthy communities, and protect natural resources. NCAT was originally created during the oil crisis of the 1970s to develop inexpensive energy-saving strategies for low-income communities.

University of Arizona

The University of Arizona is a land grant institution with a history of research and community engagement on environmental issues, including climate change and adaptation. Centers such as The Center for Climate Adaptation Science and Solutions (CCASS) brings together a wealth of expertise at the University of Arizona to support sound management choices in the context of climate change, linking science, information needs of managers, and decision-making.

Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments (GLISA)

The Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments (GLISA) is a collaboration of the University of Michigan and Michigan State University funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). GLISA is part of a national network of NOAA Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISAs) that focus on adaptation to climate change and variability. GLISA is the NOAA RISA for the Great Lakes region, and was established in 2009. RISAs act in the space between climate research and climate services.

Resilience Science Consulting, LLC

We believe we are qualified to provide climate adaptation services in the areas of construction, law and cities based, predominantly, on our experience completing such projects. As example, the framework of adaptive law informs and inspires the practice of law by Josh Stack, in advising clients such as cities and universities in how to design the legal and policy framework for adaptation projects. A project example here is advising a city land bank in how to implement a city building deconstruction pilot program.