Incorporating climate change in marine use plans for British Columbia’s First Nations

Location

United States
51° 28' 31.4256" N, 127° 58' 7.5" W
US
Summary: 

The Marine Plan Partnership for the North Pacific Coast (MaPP) is a collaboration between British Columbia’s Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, and First Nations representing the Coastal First Nations-Great Bear Initiative, the North Coast-Skeena First Nations Stewardship Society, and the Nanwakolas Council. EcoAdapt partnered with MaPP in 2012-2015 to facilitate the integration of climate change into marine use plans for the four subregions: Haida Gwaii, North Coast, Central Coast, and North Vancouver Island.

Using climate science to plan for sustainable use of the Great Barrier Reef

Location

United States
27° 56' 25.5372" S, 155° 12' 53.4384" E
US
Summary: 

The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) Marine Park Zoning Plan is the primary planning vehicle for conservation and management of the GBR Marine Park. Management is shared between the Australian and Queensland governments, and day-to-day operations are overseen by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service. The Zoning Plan aims to protect and conserve the biodiversity of the GBR ecosystem within a network of highly protected zones and provide opportunities for the ecologically sustainable use of, and access to, the reef.

The State of Climate-­Informed Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning

Coastal and marine spatial planning (CMSP) is a science-based, collaborative process used to sustainably manage resources, interests, and activities among diverse coastal and ocean users and sectors. Climate change is affecting marine and coastal ecosystems throughout the world, manifesting in warming air and sea temperatures, increasing coastal storms, and rising sea levels. The existing and projected impacts of climate change and ocean acidification need to be incorporated into planning processes to ensure long-term success. Because CMSP is an emerging field, it is important to look to other coastal and marine planning and management frameworks to identify opportunities for climate-informed action.

With the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, EcoAdapt created the Climate-Informed CMSP Initiative to examine the connections between climate change and coastal and marine planning. This included conducting a needs assessment survey to identify what practitioners need in order to integrate climate change into their planning efforts, as well as research into the state of climate-informed CMSP efforts with the intention of identifying case study examples of adaptation in action. Our key research questions included:

  1. How is climate change currently being integrated into CMSP-related efforts?
  2. How can climate-informed CMSP be done?
  3. What do practitioners need in order to integrate climate change into CMSP?

Clearwater River Subbasin (ID) Climate Change Adaptation Plan

The Clearwater River Subbasin comprises much of the original homeland of the Nez Perce Tribe (Tribe) and still is the largest population center for the Tribe. Historically, the Nez Perce people were hunters and gatherers and thrived on abundant salmon, elk and deer, camas and other roots and berries. The protection of these resources is a fundamental mission of the Nez Perce Tribe. The first documented non-Indians to traverse this area were members of the Lewis and Clark expedition, who paddled down the Clearwater River in dugout canoes in 1805. Subsequently, other early explorers and fur traders used the Clearwater River as a convenient westward route. Henry Spalding established a mission near present-day Lapwai in the 1830s. The discovery of gold on a tributary to the Clearwater River brought in large numbers of settlers. Agriculture and logging became the main economic activities in the second half of the 19th and early 20th century (Sobota 2001). Because of dams built on the Columbia River and tributaries to the Clearwater River in the 20th century, salmon and steelhead runs have been drastically reduced from historical levels. Today, agriculture, timber production and mining are still important for the region, but recreation and tourism have also become major industries.

The adaptation plan developed strategies to protect forest habitat and sustainably managed forest industry, protect water quality and quantity, and support long term economic viability for those whose livelihoods are dependent upon natural resources. A range of potential adaptive management actions exist, including the reduction of existing fuel loads in forests to lower the risk of high severity fires, increasing ecosystem connectivity to facilitate species migration and conserving and restoring adequate aquatic habitat to support ecosystem functions, to name a few.

Email Address: 
Position Title: 
Public Outreach Manager

The ADVANCE Approach - Co-generating and integrating climate risk information to build resilience for conservation, development, and disaster risk reduction

ADVANCE is a partnership between World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the Columbia University Center for Climate Systems Research (CCSR) at The Earth Institute. Launched in 2015, ADVANCE facilitates planning and decision-making by providing new ways of generating and integrating climate risk information into conservation, development, and disaster management policy and practice.

Growth Fixes for Climate Adaptation and Resilience: Changing Land Use and Building Codes and Policies to Prepare for Climate Change

This January 2017 EPA publication outlines more than 70 policies local government officials, staff, and boards can consider to help adapt to current or projected flooding and extreme precipitation, sea level rise and storm surge, extreme heat, drought, and wildfire. These policies range from modest adjustments to wholesale changes, giving communities a range of options to consider depending on their needs and context. The publication includes examples of communities implementing these policies, resources for more information, and metrics that communities could use taken from three community-scale sustainability rating systems.

Position Title: 
Climate Change Ecologist
Organization: 

North Rim Ranches Climate Change Adaptation Plan

The Southwest is considered to be one of the most “climate-challenged” landscapes in the United States (Garfin et al. 2013) and the Colorado Plateau will not be exempt from the impacts of a changing climate. Through the 21st century, the Colorado Plateau is projected to experience hotter temperatures, increased aridity and precipitation variability, and more severe droughts (Seager et al. 2007; Garfin et al. 2013; Cook et al. 2015). Projected climate changes will interact with existing land uses, and each species and ecosystem will respond in unique ways. Yet the extent, timing, and interactions of regional climate impacts are complex and not fully understood. This complexity presents a challenge for those who are working to reduce climate change impacts and to support the ability of species and ecosystems to adapt to change. Taking action based on proactive planning can promote landscape resilience and reduce the impacts from climate change.

We present a landscape-scale climate change adaptation plan that characterizes climate vulnerability and provides a foundation for adaptation action on the North Rim Ranches, a 3,360-km2 (830,000-acre) landscape of significant ecological and cultural importance on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. The extent of the North Rim Ranches is defined by the livestock grazing permits held by the Grand Canyon Trust (the Trust) for allotments on public lands managed by the North Kaibab Ranger District of the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the Arizona Strip District of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Since 2005, the Trust has been the livestock grazing permittee on the North Rim Ranches and, over the last decade, has led efforts to strengthen ecosystem health through conservation-oriented livestock management and collaborative science and restoration (Sisk et al. 2010). Climate changes such as increased risks of prolonged drought and unnaturally severe wildfire present additional challenges to the balancing of conservation objectives with livestock management, as adverse livestock grazing practices can amplify impacts to the landscape (Fleischner 1994). Adaptation actions can minimize the impacts of a changing climate and support resilient responses to current and future conditions across the landscape. This plan focuses on climate change concerns, action recommendations, and implementation opportunities for climate adaptation across the North Rim Ranches. We address five primary objectives:

Objective 1: Assess the vulnerability of the landscape of the North Rim Ranches to climate change impacts.Objective 2: Develop climate change impact scenarios related to conservation objectives to guide the development of on-the-ground adaptation actions.Objective 3: Identify and prioritize adaptation actions that can meet conservation objectives within each climate change impact scenario.Objective 4: Develop monitoring plans with measurable indicators to trigger, inform, and evaluate adaptation actions.Objective 5: Build support for adaptation implementation through effective communication and collaboration with agency, ranching, and research partners as well as the broader public.

This adaptation plan addresses these five objectives at a landscape scale, laying the groundwork for implementing adaptation action on the ground. We summarize projected climate impacts for the North Rim Ranches, map landscape-scale climate vulnerability, describe climate impact scenarios, and make recommendations for adaptation (Objectives 1, 2, 3). As monitoring plans and strategies for implementing adaptation are unique to each impact concern and recommended action, we lay out general guidelines for monitoring and building adaptation support (Objectives 4, 5). We also highlight current climate initiatives of the land management agencies and identify opportunities for collaboration among our multiple partners.

This climate change adaptation plan lays out climate change concerns, adaptation recommendations, and next steps for a large public landscape north of the Grand Canyon. While this climate change adaptation plan is by no means comprehensive, we aim for it to be used as a scientific reference and as a guide for integrating climate adaptation objectives into our own conservation planning. We hope that it can serve as a foundation for engaging with agency, ranching, and research partners in collaborative climate adaptation.

North Rim Ranches Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Location

Public lands north of the Grand Canyon AZ
United States
34° 2' 56.1408" N, 111° 5' 37.4316" W
Arizona US
Organization: 
Grand Canyon Trust
Organization: 
Summary: 

We present a landscape-scale climate change adaptation plan that characterizes climate vulnerability and provides a foundation for adaptation action on the North Rim Ranches, a 3,360-km2 (830,000-acre) landscape of significant ecological and cultural importance on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. The extent of the North Rim Ranches is defined by the livestock grazing permits held by the Grand Canyon Trust (the Trust) for allotments on public lands managed by the North Kaibab Ranger District of the U.S.