CLIMAS, housed at the University of Arizona's Institute of the Environment, was established in 1998 as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) program to help address growing environmental and social concerns.

The State of Marine and Coastal Adaptation in North America: A Synthesis of Emerging Ideas

Climate change is now widely acknowledged as a global problem that threatens the success of marine and coastal conservation, management, and policy. Mitigation and adaptation are the two approaches commonly used to address actual and projected climate change impacts. Mitigation applies to efforts to decrease the rate and extent of climate change through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions or the enhancement of carbon uptake and storage; adaptation deals with minimizing the negative effects or exploiting potential opportunities of climate change. Because the benefits of mitigation are not immediate and because we are already committed to a certain amount of climate change, adaptation has been increasingly viewed as an essential component of an effective climate change response strategy. The field of adaptation is developing rapidly but in an ad hoc fashion, and organizations and governments are often challenged to make sense of the dispersed information that is available.

The intent of this report is to provide a brief overview of key climate change impacts on the natural and built environments in marine and coastal North America and a review of adaptation options available to and in use by marine and coastal managers. This report presents the results of EcoAdapt’s efforts to survey, inventory, and assess adaptation projects from different regions, jurisdictions, and scales throughout North America’s marine and coastal environments.

Preparing for Climate Change in the Upper Willamette River Basin

Location

United States
44° 24' 32.1588" N, 122° 32' 29.4144" W
US
Organization: 
Summary: 

The Upper Willamette River Basin of western Oregon borders the Coast Mountain Range to the west and the headwaters of the Cascade Mountains to the east. The Basin encompasses nearly two million acres, 90% of which is forested. Climate change is likely to alter natural systems and resources of the Upper Willamette River Basin, subsequently affecting ecosystem services in the region.

U.S. Global Change Research Program

Location

United States
40° 37' 30.2772" N, 100° 32' 48.75" W
US
Summary: 

The U.S. Global Change Research Program’s mission is “to build a knowledge base that informs human responses to climate and global change through coordinated and integrated federal programs of research, education, communication, and decision support.” The Program produces assessments of climate change and its implications, participates in the U.S. Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force, and provides educational materials to support climate literacy and educational development.

Developing a National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy for the United States

Location

United States
41° 0' 39.0816" N, 99° 50' 37.5" W
US
Summary: 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in partnership with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and state and tribal wildlife agencies, created a National Fish, Wildlife, and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy to coordinate climate change responses in both the public and private sector. The strategy, released in March 2013, is a framework to guide responsible adaptation action by natural resource managers around the United States in the face of a changing climate.

Creating a National Adaptation Strategy for the United States: The Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force

Location

United States
37° 58' 23.0772" N, 84° 22' 30" W
US
Summary: 

In October 2010, the U.S. Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force released a series of recommendations to President Obama on how federal agencies could coordinate and collaborate on a national adaptation strategy. The Task Force released two progress reports in 2010 and 2011, and plans to continue to support implementation of the recommendations. This process represents the first steps towards a coordinated strategy for federal adaptation action on climate change.

Preparing for Climate Change in the Klamath Basin

Location

United States
42° 13' 23.1384" N, 121° 48' 59.0616" W
US
Organization: 
Summary: 

Located across southern Oregon and northern California, the Klamath Basin consists of unique ecological areas and natural resources that provide important ecosystem services to the region. Climate change impacts, such as warmer air temperatures and decreases in water levels, are likely to significantly affect natural systems and resources of the Klamath Basin.

Email Address: 
Position Title: 
Climate Change Scientist
Organization: 

Oregon Climate Assessment Report

The group of scientists that make up the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found in 2007 that the warming of Earth’s climate is unequivocal and largely due to human activity. Earth’s climate has changed in the past, though the recent magnitude and pace of changes are unprecedented in human existence. Recent decades have been warmer than at any time in roughly 120,000 years. Most of this warming can be attributed to anthropogenic activity, primarily burning fossil fuels (coal, oil and natural gas) for energy. Burning fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gases, also known as greenhouse gases, into the atmosphere. This warming cannot be explained by natural causes (volcanic and solar) alone. It can be said with confidence that human activities are primarily responsible for the observed 1.5 °F increase in 20th century temperatures in the Pacific Northwest. A warmer climate will affect this state substantially.

In 2007, the Oregon State Legislature charged the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute, via HB 3543, with assessing the state of climate change science including biological, physical and social science as it relates to Oregon and the likely effects of climate change on the state. This inaugural assessment report is meant to act as a compendium of the relevant research on climate change and its impacts on the state of Oregon. This report draws on a large body of work on climate change impacts in the western US from the Climate Impacts Group at the University of Washington and the California Climate Action Team. In this report, we also identify knowledge gaps, where we acknowledge the need for more research in certain areas. We hope this report will serve as a useful resource for decision-makers, stakeholders, researchers and all Oregonians. The following chapters address key sectors that fall within the biological, physical and social sciences in the state of Oregon.

Lake Erie Lakewide Management Plan Report: Section 11 Significant Ongoing and Emerging Issues

From the Introduction:

The dynamic nature of Lake Erie means that things change, often unpredictably. Section 2 describes how the issues of concern in the lake have changed over time. Some of the issues were resolved through management actions over a short period of time, while others required long-term and ongoing management plans. Some goals, such as phosphorus concentrations in the lake, were considered achieved until zebra mussels invaded and concentrations began fluctuating again. The invasion of a host of new non-native species has created much alteration in the biological community. The ecosystem management objectives for Lake Erie attempt to set goals for management actions in the areas of land use, nutrient management, contaminants, resource use and non-native invasive species. It may be necessary to continually revisit these goals as new unexpected situations arise. This section provides some insight into programs and problems that are currently important in the lake, as well as those that may be emerging as important future issues. The adaptive management approach of the LaMP process accepts the fact that change is inevitable. The challenge to the LaMP is to keep abreast of lake conditions, identify and encourage research in areas needed to make the appropriate management decisions, and modify management goals and actions when needed.