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Potential Ecological Consequences of Climate Change in South Florida and the Everglades

Global climate changes are likely to have profound e ects on the Earth’s ecosystems and on our perspectives on ecological conservation. Regional models project varying trends across the United States and even between southern and northern Florida. The purpose of this report is to summarize climate change literature pertinent to south Florida, particularly the Everglades, and to assess potential ecosystem vulnerabilities and the capacity for adaptation to climate change in this important ecosystem.

Storm Surges, Rising Seas and Flood Risks in Metropolitan Buenos Aires

Many parts of the developing world are subject to variable and extreme climate, the impacts of which impede development and point to the need to improve the understanding and management of climate risks. These needs are being amplified by human-caused climate change. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded in its 2001 report that much of the developing world is highly vulnerable to adverse impacts from climate change.

The Patchwork Quilt: A Creative Strategy for Safe and Long Term Post-Disaster Rebuilding

Individuals, residents, business owners, community leaders, and taxpayers are increasingly frustrated with the hardship and costs associated with repeatedly rebuilding structures in areas that suffer natural disasters, especially floods, year after year. Modern advances in the sciences of hydrology and hydraulics, coupled with the National Flood Insurance Program’s efforts to create maps of all areas of the United States that are especially prone to flooding, make it possible to have a fairly good understanding of the velocities, depth and future location of floods.

Florida’s Energy & Climate Change Action Plan

Florida's Energy and Climate Change Action Plan is the framework that will secure Florida's energy future, reduce greenhouse gas emissions,and support emerging "green tech sector." The Plan addresses seven main strategies including inventory and projections of Florida's greenhouse gas emissions,energy supply and demand,cap and trade,transportation and land use, agriculture, forestry, and waste management, government policy and coordination, and adaptation strategies.

Maryland Climate Action Plan

On April 20, 2007, Governor Martin O’Malley signed Executive Order 01.01.2007.07 (the Order) establishing the Maryland Commission on Climate Change (the Commission). Sixteen State agency heads and six members of the General Assembly comprise the Commission. The principal charge of the Commission is to develop a Plan of Action (the Climate Action Plan) to address the drivers of climate change, to prepare for its likely impacts in Maryland, and to establish goals and timetables for implementation.

Comprehensive Strategy for Reducing Maryland’s Vulnerability to Climate Change Phase I: Sea-level rise and coastal storms

The Adaptation and Response Working Group (ARWG) of the Maryland Commission on Climate Change (mccc) was charged with developing the Comprehensive Strategy for Reducing Maryland’s Vulnerability to Climate Change. The Executive Order calls for the Strategy to outline specific policy recommendations for reducing the vulnerability of the state’s natural and cultural resources and communities to the impacts of climate change, with an initial focus on sea-level rise and coastal hazards, including shore erosion and coastal flooding.

Maryland Climate Action Plan, Chapter 5: Reducing Maryland’s Vulnerability to Climate Change

On April 20, 2007, Governor Martin O’Malley signed Executive Order 01.01.2007.07 (the Order) establishing the Maryland Commission on Climate Change (the Commission). Sixteen State agency heads and six members of the General Assembly comprise the Commission. The principal charge of the Commission is to develop a Plan of Action (the Climate Action Plan) to address the drivers of climate change, to prepare for its likely impacts in Maryland, and to establish goals and timetables for implementation.

Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Atlantic Canada

Atlantic Canada communities are already experiencing the effects of climate change and this will intensify in the future. Sea level rise, combined with geologic sinking in the Atlantic region, is of particular concern. More frequent and intense storm events, and water variability causing floods and drought, are anticipated. Atlantic communities located in coastal areas and along inland waters, and the infrastructure and resources they rely on, will be increasingly stressed by climate change impacts.

Assessing the Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Invasive Species

Different components of global environmental change are typically studied and managed independently, although there is a growing recognition that multiple drivers often interact in complex and nonadditive ways. We present a conceptual framework and empirical review of the interactive effects of climate change and invasive species in freshwater ecosystems. Climate change is expected to result in warmer water temperatures, shorter duration of ice cover, altered streamflow patterns, increased salinization, and increased demand for water storage and conveyance structures.

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