Whitehorse Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Climate has been changing in Whitehorse. It is clear from weather data going back to the 1940s that temperature has been warming, especially in winters. Spring break up has been arriving earlier, freeze up later and frost free days have been increasing. The Whitehorse Community Adaptation Project, or WhiteCAP, funded by the Northern Strategy Trust, begins the process of preparing Whitehorse for climate change. WhiteCAP consists of two distinct phases: planning and implementation. The WhiteCAP plan assesses how climate change may positively or negatively affect the community over the next forty years, to 2050. The first half of the planning process focuses on exploring multiple scenarios of how the community may change by 2050, and is presented in the companion document for this plan: Future Histories of Whitehorse: Scenarios of Change. The second half of the planning process assesses the risks of climate change impacts and then the priorities of climate change adaptations. Portions of the plan have been implemented in the second year of the WhiteCAP project.

Lake Tahoe Climate Change Adaptation Strategy Project

Location

United States
39° 5' 50.262" N, 120° 1' 52.0608" W
US
Summary: 

Agencies and stakeholders working in the Lake Tahoe Basin initiated a project to provide guidance and create procedures to address current and projected climate change impacts in the region. The project developed tools to evaluate and communicate climate adaptation and mitigation actions for the Basin. A working group composed of multiple agencies and stakeholders was created to provide input and guidance, and share findings and products within their organizations.

Climate Change Information for Adaptation: Climate Trends and Projected Values for Canada from 2010 to 2050

This report summarizes for 18 regions, the observed climate trends to date and some climate related factors. Projections are then given to 2050 of these key climate and climate-related factors. These related factors emphasize events or trends which result in hardship or damages or benefits, and are often felt most strongly in communities. An emphasis has been placed on extreme events when data and projections were available, since they often cause the largest damages and human disruptions. Where very limited Canadian data are available, trends in adjacent U.S.A., where much more such data have been available and analyzed, are cited.

The Oregon Climate Change Research Institute (OCCRI), based at Oregon State University (OSU), is a network of over 100 researchers at OSU, the University of Oregon, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, and affiliated federal and state labs.

The State of Marine and Coastal Adaptation in North America: A Synthesis of Emerging Ideas

Climate change is now widely acknowledged as a global problem that threatens the success of marine and coastal conservation, management, and policy. Mitigation and adaptation are the two approaches commonly used to address actual and projected climate change impacts. Mitigation applies to efforts to decrease the rate and extent of climate change through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions or the enhancement of carbon uptake and storage; adaptation deals with minimizing the negative effects or exploiting potential opportunities of climate change. Because the benefits of mitigation are not immediate and because we are already committed to a certain amount of climate change, adaptation has been increasingly viewed as an essential component of an effective climate change response strategy. The field of adaptation is developing rapidly but in an ad hoc fashion, and organizations and governments are often challenged to make sense of the dispersed information that is available.

The intent of this report is to provide a brief overview of key climate change impacts on the natural and built environments in marine and coastal North America and a review of adaptation options available to and in use by marine and coastal managers. This report presents the results of EcoAdapt’s efforts to survey, inventory, and assess adaptation projects from different regions, jurisdictions, and scales throughout North America’s marine and coastal environments.

Creating a More Resilient Yellowknife: Climate Change Impacts and Municipal Decision Making

Location

United States
62° 27' 14.2992" N, 114° 22' 18.4404" W
US
Summary: 

With a grant from the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs the City of Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories, Canada, engaged a group of stakeholders in an extensive adaptation planning process. The city, with the support of the Pembina Institute, hosted three workshops to discuss impacts to the region and viable local adaptation options. The project results were written up in a summary document authored by the Pembina Institute and included recommendations for the city to take to make Yellowknife more resilient to climate change.

Atuliqtuq: A Collaborative Approach in Support of the Nunavut Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Location

United States
64° 32' 9.0528" N, 66° 53' 5.1576" W
US
Summary: 

To increase provincial and local ability to adapt to climate change, the Government of Nunavut joined together with the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), and the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND) to form a partnership to support local communities while helping to develop Nunavut’s climate change adaptation strategy.

Emergency Preparedness on Seabird Island

Location

United States
49° 16' 0.0012" N, 121° 43' 0.0012" W
US
Summary: 

Seabird Island is located in British Columbia, Canada, and is home to a First Nation population. Increased precipitation and snowmelt threaten to flood the community of Seabird Island. To proactively prepare the community for possible flooding, the Seabird Island Emergency Response Team has developed an emergency preparedness plan that was distributed to community members through a door-to- door awareness and educational campaign spearheaded by the local fire department.

Nunat Climate Observations Database

Location

United States
68° 11' 36.0024" N, 162° 46' 24.3768" W
US
Summary: 

The Nunat Climate Observations Database is part of a broader website (www.nunat.net) created to facilitate the exchange of tribal observations of climate, land, and subsistence changes in Native Villages in Alaska. The database is searchable by geographic location, date range, and type of change, and is supplemented by additional information on stressors (e.g., contaminants) that may exacerbate the effects of climate change.

Relocating the Village of Kivalina, Alaska Due to Coastal Erosion

Location

United States
67° 43' 36.9984" N, 164° 31' 59.9988" W
US
Summary: 

Residents in Kivalina, Alaska have pursued relocation efforts for almost 20 years because of overcrowding and erosion problems. The village identified a preferred relocation site about eight miles away in Kiniktuuraq; this site was deemed unsuitable by the Army Corps of Engineers who found that flooding and erosion at the new site would cause additional problems. The relocation process is in a stalemate as the village seeks technical assistance and funding to support their efforts.