Adaptation to Sea Level Rise in Florida

Even a 1-meter rise in sea level, which is now a conservative estimate for the year 2100, could be devastating to the human population and to nature in Florida. The Florida Institute for Conservation Science (FICS) has initiated a project to study and communicate issues related to the impacts of, and adaptation to, sea level rise in Florida. The first phase of this project included a scientific symposium, which was held January 18-20, 2010, at Archbold Biological Station.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the premier government agency dedicated to the conservation, protection, and enhancement of fish, wildlife and plants, and their habitats. It is the only agency in the federal government whose primary responsibility is management of these important natural resources for the American public. The Service also helps ensure a healthy environment for people through its work benefiting wildlife, and by providing opportunities for Americans to enjoy the outdoors and our shared natural heritage.

Position Title: 
Conservation Associate
Organization: 

Sentinel Monitoring of Salt Marshes in the North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve

The North Carolina NERR, along with four other NERRs, is acting as a sentinel site to monitor climate change impacts on salt marsh habitat. This project involves creating a long-term ecological monitoring program to determine the effects of sea level rise, warmer temperatures, and coastal storms on salt marshes.

Sentinel Monitoring of Salt Marshes in the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve

The Wells Reserve, along with four other National Estuarine Research Reserves, is acting as a sentinel site to monitor climate change impacts on salt marsh habitat. This project involves creating a long-term ecological monitoring program to determine the effects of sea level rise, saltwater intrusion, warmer temperatures, and coastal storms on salt marshes.

Creating a Gulf Coast Community Handbook for Restoration and Adaptation

Through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Climate Ready Estuaries Program, the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) and Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program (CBBEP) are working together to create a handbook to identify strategies that incorporate resilience to climate change as a component of habitat restoration and protection.