Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: The Caribbean

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including the Caribbean. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in the Caribbean was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership between October 2010 and April 2011. Covering the countries of Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Trinidad and Tobago, the rapid review examined: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional level. This review of adaptation action in the Caribbean is one of 12 profiles covering regions in Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: South Asia

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant increase in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including South Asia. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in Central Asia was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. Covering the countries of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, the rapid review examined: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional levels. This review of adaptation action in South Asia is one of 12 profiles covering regions in Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: The Pacific

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including the Pacific. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in the Pacific was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. This review covered the countries of the Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. The review identified: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional level. This review of adaptation action in the Pacific is one of 12 profiles covering regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: East and Southeast Asia

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including East and Southeast Asia. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in East and Southeast Asia was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. This review covered the East Asian countries of China, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) and Mongolia, and the Southeast Asian countries of Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, Timor-Leste and Viet Nam.2 The review identified priority adaptation needs, efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning, the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors, and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional levels. This review of adaptation action in East and Southeast Asia is one of 12 profiles covering regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: Central Asia

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant increase in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including Central Asia. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in Central Asia was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. Covering the countries of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, the rapid review examined: identified priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional levels. This review of adaptation action in Central Asia is one of 12 profiles covering the regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: West Africa

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including West Africa. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in West Africa was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. The rapid review examined: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional levels. This review of adaptation action in West Africa is one of 12 profiles covering regions in Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: Southern Africa

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including southern Africa. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in southern Africa was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership between October 2010 and April 2011. Covering the countries of Botswana, Comoros, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe, the rapid review examined: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional level. This review of adaptation action in southern Africa is one of 12 profiles covering regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: North Africa

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in North Africa was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. Covering the countries of Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia and Yemen, the rapid review examined: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional level. This review of adaptation action in North Africa is one of 12 profiles covering regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

The Role of Land Use in Adaptation to Increased Precipitation and Flooding: A Case Study in Wisconsin’s Lower Fox River Basin

From the Executive Summary:

Climate models predict that storms and flooding will increase in frequency and severity in some regions. In light of these predictions, and with appreciation for the great uncertainty in these forecasts, communities will be looking for ways to improve their resilience to extreme events. Protection of natural areas and open space is one option.

Strategically protecting natural lands and open space can reduce damages from flooding and also provide environmental and social benefits, including improved water quality in streams and rivers, protection of groundwater sources, and enhanced recreational opportunities. Governments around the world are increasingly recognizing that “green infrastructure” can often be a costeffective substitute for the gray infrastructure—pipes, dams, levees—traditionally used to control flooding.

Nevertheless, many questions remain for communities. How much land should be protected, and where? How does the community balance flood protection and the co-benefits of green infrastructure in choosing which lands to target? And how does it maximize the net benefits of the actions—the benefits of flood protection, water quality, recreation, and so forth, minus the costs of protecting the land from development? Finally, how can the local government bring about this landuse change? What policies and approaches are feasible and cost-effective?

We address such questions in a case study of the Lower Fox River basin in Wisconsin. The Lower Fox River flows northeast from central Wisconsin to Green Bay, the largest freshwater estuary in the world. Water quality here has been a problem for decades, and many areas experience flooding. Scientists predict that these problems will worsen in the future with climate change: extreme precipitation events are expected to increase, leading to more flooding and exacerbating water pollution. Moreover, some parts of the basin are experiencing development pressures. The impervious surfaces that come with development tend to intensify flooding and some water quality problems, and flooding damages increase with the number of buildings located in floodplains.

Local government planners in other areas facing similar issues will find a framework here for determining the costs and benefits of using land-use policy to mitigate flood damage. While the case study is specific to Wisconsin, the methodology applies equally to other locations.

How Well is Scotland Preparing for Climate Change?

This the ASC's first report to Scotland. Following reports on how well the UK is prepared to deal with climate change, the ASC was asked by the Scottish Government to undertake an evaluation of how well Scotland is preparing for climate change. This report provides an independent assessment of Scotland’s preparedness for climate change, based on the ASC’s ‘preparedness ladder’. The aim of the report is to help inform the development of Scotland’s first statutory Adaptation Programme and to provide a baseline to measure future progress.