Regional Municipal Planning Strategy (2014)

The Regional Plan, as adopted in 2006, emphasized a balanced approach to development and established targets for directing housing growth over the life of the Regional Plan (2006-2031). Twenty-five percent of the growth was to be directed to the Regional Centre (Peninsula Halifax and Dartmouth between the Circumferential Highway and Halifax Harbour); fifty percent directed to the urban communities (communities serviced with publicly managed water and wastewater services outside the Regional Centre) and the remaining twenty-five percent to the rural areas.

In preparing the first five year review of the Plan, the Stantec Quantifying Study was commissioned to assess the public, private and social costs and benefits of various growth scenarios from 2011 to 2031. That Study also considered how these scenarios may impact our environment, health and social well-being and benchmarked HRM with other Canadian and US municipalities to assist in this evaluation. 

From the Ground Up: The State of the States on Climate Adaptation for Agriculture

This paper analyzes how state climate adaptation plans treat agriculture and food systems, and identifies challenges and best practices and lift-up innovative approaches for the future. To conduct the analysis, every state was catalouged with a climate adaptation plan that makes concrete recommendations for agricultural adaptation. A list of every agriculture-related policy proposal was created in each state plan and sorted those strategies into ten categories based on our best interpretation of their goals. Eight strategies identified by the USDA in the 2016 report “Adaptation Resources for Agriculture,” were pulled. Two additional categories we identified as important were added, covering financial support and technical assistance.

Key Findings

A few important trends stand out in state climate adaptation plans.

  1. Few states are considering ambitious changes to their agricultural systems, such as changing crop types to fit the altered climate or using new approaches to animal production.
  2. Locally focused adaptation strategies with less daunting scopes, such as those focused on soil and water quality, have gained traction.
  3. Strategies designed to support farmers with technical and financial support for climate adaptation are well-represented.
  4. Very little attention is given to biodiversity, how to “manage farms and fields as part of a larger landscape,” a potentially powerful tool in the face of climate change.
  5. Investing in agriculture-related infrastructure as part of climate adaptation is similarly under-represented.

Embracing Change - Adapting Conservation Approaches to Address a Changing Climate

Climate change may undermine the effectiveness of current efforts to conserve wildlife and ecosystems. Given that time and money for conservation are limited, there is a need for responsible investments that embrace the realities of a changing climate. A thorough consideration of anticipated climate change impacts can reveal the necessity of intentional, strategic, and forward-looking adjustments to what kinds of actions are being implemented, where actions are located, when actions are needed, and what goals those actions are designed to achieve. This report offers real-world examples of how conservation practitioners are already beginning to modify the WHAT, WHERE, WHEN, and WHY of their conservation endeavors. These stories are intended to inspire others to take a closer look at their conservation strategies and determine whether different approaches will be needed to make the most of limited conservation dollars in the context of climate change and uncertainty. 

 

Monitoring & evaluation in climate change adaptation projects: Highlights for conservation practitioners

Monitoring on-the-ground implementation projects in the face of climate change shares much in common with monitoring and evaluation best practices that have been advocated for in conservation in recent years. However, climate change presents some additional challenges that warrant consideration. Here we provide a brief summary of current thinking on the monitoring and evaluation of climate adaptation projects, and point readers towards additional resources.

The Heros Journey: Climate Adaptation and Creative Non-Fiction Writing

In episode 58 of America Adapts, Doug Parsons talks with author and lecturer Elizabeth Rush, of Brown University. Elizabeth is the author of the upcoming book, Rising – Dispatches from the New American Shore.  Topics discussed in this episode:

  • What is ‘creative non-fiction.’
  • Elizabeth explains how humans have or don’t have the emotional resilience to respond to climate change
  • Writing “adaptation metaphors.”
  • Narrative devices like “The Hero’s Journey” to make climate change resonate.
  • The emerging role of Cli- Fi, climate science fiction.
  • And much more!

Listen here.
Now on Spotify!

A Population Vulnerability Assessment and Climate Adaptation Framework for the City of Oakdale, Minnesota

Location

City of Oakdale 55128 Oakdale , MN
United States
44° 57' 48.7692" N, 92° 57' 53.2008" W
Minnesota US
Organization: 
paleBLUEdot LLC
Organization: 
Summary: 

The City of Oakdale, Minnesota received funding in 2017 to conduct a vulnerability assessment and adaptation planning project. The Population Vulnerability Assessment and Climate Adaptation Framework report includes a review of past and projected climate change impacts, and the identification of community vulnerabilities and adaptation strategies. Climate changes experienced over the last 50 years will are detailed, as well as climate change projections through 2100 for the Midwest region as a whole, the State of Minnesota, and the City of Oakdale.