RainReady

Tool Overview: 

RainReady℠ is a trademarked initiative of the Center for Neighborhood Technology, a national nonprofit headquartered in Chicago. We help people manage flooding and drought in a time of climate change.

How does RainReady work?

Green Infrastructure Toolkit

Tool Overview: 

The purpose of this toolkit is to analyze common trends in the approaches various cities are taking to planning, implementing, and funding green infrastructure to manage stormwater. The toolkit is intended to aid local governments nationwide in comparing best practices across cities, drawing lessons from different approaches, and crafting similar policies for their own jurisdictions.

Climate Smart Cities™

Tool Overview: 

Cities are on the front line of climate change. They can be an important part of the solution by offering energy-efficient living for our growing population—but they must also face the growing threat of heat waves and flooding. Our Climate-Smart Cities program helps cities nationwide create parks and conserve land to meet the climate challenge.

We help cities use parks and natural lands as “green infrastructure” serving four objectives:

Community Based Public-Private Partnerships (CBP3s) and Alternative Market-Based Tools for Integrated Green Stormwater Infrastructure

Public Private Partnerships (P3s) have the potential to help many communities optimize their limited resources through agreements with private parties to help build and maintain their public infrastructure. P3s have successfully designed, built, and maintained many types of public infrastructure, such as roads, and drinking water/wastewater utilities across the U.S. Until recently, there have been no P3s specifically developed for stormwater management or Clean Water Act requirements. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 3 Water Protection Division (WPD) has been researching, benchmarking, and evaluating P3s for their potential adaptation and use in the Chesapeake Bay region. On December 6, 2012, the EPA Region 3 WPD hosted a P3 Experts Roundtable in Philadelphia, PA (U.S. EPA, 2013a). The goal of the P3 Roundtable was to provide a forum for a targeted group of private sector representatives to discuss in detail the feasibility, practicality, and benefits of using P3s to assist jurisdictions in the finance, design, construction, and O&M of an urban stormwater retrofit program. The results of this Roundtable are the foundation and approach for applying a stormwater P3 model across the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

This guide will provide communities with an opportunity to review the capacity and potential to develop a P3 program to help “close the gap” between current resources and the funding that will be required to meet stormwater regulatory commitments and community stormwater management needs. In addition, this guide and the tools presented are a continuing effort, commitment, and partnership between EPA Region 3 and communities in the Chesapeake Bay region. We believe it will help to raise the bar and further advance the restoration goals and objectives for the Chesapeake Bay.

EPA Financing Green Infrastructure: A Best Practices Guide for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund

Since 1988, EPA’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) has established itself as an important source of affordable funding for infrastructure projects that improve and maintain the quality of our nation’s waters. Each of the 51 programs operating independently across the United States and Puerto Rico demonstrate the power of federal and state partnerships to leverage financial resources in the interest of building sustainable infrastructure and protecting public health and water quality. There is no single prescription for accomplishing these goals; infrastructure solutions must be tailored to meet the environmental and economic needs of individual communities. States have significant flexibility within the CWSRF to establish their own funding priorities, assist communities of all sizes, and address a wide range of water quality concerns.

This best practices guide illustrates a variety of incentives states use to encourage consideration and implementation of green infrastructure and foster sustainability within their programs. Some of the incentives and examples featured in the guide are not specific to green infrastructure, but could easily be adapted to focus on green infrastructure implementation. Likewise, many of the practices that are specific to green infrastructure can also be applied to other sustainable projects such as water and energy efficiency. State programs have used the practices in this guide with great success. EPA is pleased to highlight these efforts in the hope that other interested programs can follow their example.

Southeastern Connecticut Regional Resilience Vision Project

Location

New Haven
55 Church Street Floor 3
06510 New Haven , CT
United States
41° 18' 18.2736" N, 72° 55' 34.7304" W
Connecticut US
Organization: 
The Nature Conservancy
Organization: 
Summary: 

In the fall of 2016, a partnership between The Nature Conservancy, the Southeastern Connecticut Council of Governments, and the Southeastern Connecticut Enterprise Region convened a group of over fifty stakeholders from Southeastern Connecticut to discuss the impacts of rising sea levels, extreme weather, and changing social and economic conditions on the resilience of the region and its communities.

Indore City Resilience Strategy

This document is prepared with the aim of providing a framework for development of climate resilience strategy for the city of Indore. It has been developed based on interaction with city stakeholders, sector studies conducted to understand different dimensions of current situation, information from secondary literature, and through conduct of risk to resilience workshop. The City Resilience Strategy, is aimed at city managers and people at large. This document is based on the current situation and has a scope for updation to reflect emerging trends over time. The resilience strategies will therefore evolve over time with better understanding of climate change phenomena as well as emerging city level issues.

Gulf South Rising 2015 - Final Report

Gulf South Rising was a regional movement of coordinated actions and events to highlight the impact of the global climate crisis on the Gulf South region. Through collaborative events and actions around strategic dates in 2015, Gulf South Rising demanded a just transition away from extractive industries, discriminatory policies, and unjust practices that hinder equitable recovery from disaster and impede the development of sustainable communities.

This year-long initiative

  1. built regional movement infrastructure;
  2. connected and convened frontline communities around collective healing and ecological equity;
  3. advanced regional efforts of indigenous tribal and land sovereignty and
  4. shifted the regional narrative from resilience to resistance.

The Gulf South Rising (GSR) Strategy Document was created through a five-year community process anchored by the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy using People’s Movement Assemblies (PMAs) as the method for community-based issue mapping and agenda setting. The PMA process allowed frontline community members of the Gulf South to collectively identify their own problems and vision their own solutions. Notes and decisions from five years of these PMAs across the region were synthesized into the Gulf South Rising strategy document. The Gulf South Rising Strategy Document principles for moving together, defined broad goals and specific objectives for the initiative, and structured collective regional actions around the 2015 calendar year.

The year 2015 was a movement year for the Gulf South and the Nation. Important “Movement Dates” included 50 years since the Selma March, 10 years since Hurricane Katrina, 5 years since the BP Deepwater Horizon Explosion, 40 years since the end of the Vietnam War, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act, and many more. Through shared work around these “Movement Dates” the Gulf South Rising initiative aimed to amplify the good work continuously being done in the Gulf South and connect authentic community across the region.

While crafted around commemorations. The Gulf South Rising initiative was strategically more than the sum of its parts. A regional collective of residents developed and supported leadership on the ground through the shared work of many of these commemorations. The GSR initiative created a culture of engagement and decision-making rooted in true democracy, trained local advocates on the intersection of climate change and social justice, and ensured that stories were told authentically by the people of the Gulf South. Gulf South Rising collectivized the 2015 movement energy in the region to support self-determination at the grassroots level for Gulf South communities. Participants in this 12-month initiative have determined that the Gulf South is Rising.

U.S. Department of Justice Climate Change Adaptation Plan

This document presents the Department of Justice (DOJ) Climate Change Adaptation Plan (also referred to as the “Adaptation Plan”), to be submitted to the White House Council on Environmental Quality as part of the DOJ 2014 Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan and implemented throughout DOJ in FY 2014 and beyond. DOJ, along with other Federal agencies, is required to comply with the climate resiliency directives under Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance (2009) and EO 13653, Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change (2013).

In accordance with these requirements, this Adaptation Plan presents DOJ’s climate change policy framework, summarizes the results of the agency’s high-level vulnerability analysis, describes the overall process envisioned for preparedness planning and evaluation, and identifies specific actions for increasing climate resilience. The Adaptation Plan includes a detailed discussion of the programmatic activities and actions the agency intends to pursue to both better understand and address climate change risks and opportunities in FY 2014 and beyond. These actions align with the four major climate change vulnerabilities identified by DOJ in the 2012 U.S. Department of Justice Climate Change Adaptation Plan: 1) physical damage to buildings, utilities infrastructure, and assets; 2) health impacts to personnel; 3) disruption of operations resulting from potential unrest among affected populations; and 4) depletion of fiscal resources.

Storm-Ready Cities: How Climate Resilience Boosts Metro Areas and the Economy

In his Climate Action Plan, President Barack Obama acknowledged the risks of climate change to families, businesses, infrastructure, and water supplies across the country. To help metro areas manage these risks, the president pledged to reduce flood damage by raising flood elevation standards for federally funded infrastructure projects, to support community resilience through existing federal grant programs, and to make climate change information more accessible, among other actions. But given the high cost of strengthening cities to withstand extreme weather—which the journal Climate Policy reports could rise to hundreds of billions of dollars per year by the middle or end of the century—and the even higher cost of inaction, urban and federal leaders must do more to increase metro-area resilience.

In this report, we identify climate change risks to cities, highlight metro areas that are taking the lead to build resilience in ways that support economic growth and help tackle other pressing challenges, and recommend local and federal actions to further support urban resilience and inclusive, sustainable economic growth. Our recommendations include: