Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: East and Southeast Asia

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including East and Southeast Asia. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in East and Southeast Asia was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. This review covered the East Asian countries of China, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) and Mongolia, and the Southeast Asian countries of Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, Timor-Leste and Viet Nam.2 The review identified priority adaptation needs, efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning, the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors, and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional levels. This review of adaptation action in East and Southeast Asia is one of 12 profiles covering regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: Central Asia

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant increase in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including Central Asia. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in Central Asia was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. Covering the countries of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, the rapid review examined: identified priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional levels. This review of adaptation action in Central Asia is one of 12 profiles covering the regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: West Africa

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including West Africa. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in West Africa was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. The rapid review examined: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional levels. This review of adaptation action in West Africa is one of 12 profiles covering regions in Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: Southern Africa

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including southern Africa. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in southern Africa was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership between October 2010 and April 2011. Covering the countries of Botswana, Comoros, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe, the rapid review examined: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional level. This review of adaptation action in southern Africa is one of 12 profiles covering regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: North Africa

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in North Africa was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. Covering the countries of Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia and Yemen, the rapid review examined: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional level. This review of adaptation action in North Africa is one of 12 profiles covering regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: Middle Africa

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including Middle Africa. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in Middle Africa was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. Covering the countries of Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic (CAR), Chad, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and São Tomé e Principe (STP), the rapid review examined: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional levels. This review of adaptation action in Middle Africa is one of 12 profiles covering regions in Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Review of Current and Planned Adaptation Action: East Africa

Growing understanding of the need to adapt to the impacts of climate change has led to a significant rise in ongoing and planned adaptation action in the developing regions of the world, including East Africa. This upsurge in climate change adaptation action is a welcome occurrence, but enhanced coordination among expanding networks of adaptation actors is needed to ensure resources are deployed quickly and effectively. Responding to this concern, a review of current and planned adaptation action in East Africa was undertaken by the Adaptation Partnership1 between October 2010 and April 2011. Covering the countries of Burundi, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, United Republic of Tanzania and Uganda, the rapid review examined: priority adaptation needs; efforts by governments to support adaptation though policy and planning; the scope of international support for adaptation efforts in different countries and sectors; and potential gaps in adaptation efforts at the country and regional level. This review of adaptation action in East Africa is one of 12 profiles covering regions of Africa, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean completed by the Adaptation Partnership.

Lessons for Adaptation in Sub-Saharan Africa

From the Foreword:

Sub-Saharan Africa has been clearly identified to be at the frontline of the most vulnerable regions requiring urgent assistance in addressing climate change challenges in terms of sufficiently funded adaptation programmes and projects at multiple scales and time frames. There has certainly been convergence on the need for strong adaptation frameworks to address the concerns of vulnerable countries in Africa. The successful implementation of any framework requires that every option towards a solution needs to be explored, especially if it offers multiple opportunities and provides cost effectiveness. Unfortunately, what have been lacking are the options on the types of adaptation actions to be implemented. Using flexible targeted approaches may help to identify the types of actions that need to be implemented. This will be a first step towards ensuring timely and realistic adaptation across the Sub-Saharan African region.

CC DARE Lessons for Adaptation show in a myriad of ways, from community based programmes to government programmes and entrepreneurial endeavours, how concrete demonstration actions can provide solutions that can move countries and communities in Sub-Saharan Africa towards low carbon and climate resilient development. When an action delivers solutions with multiple benefits and beneficiaries ranging from reducing environmental impacts to engineering a transition to greener economic growth, this can be embraced by other countries.

The various lessons learnt highlighted in this document are highly relevant in contributing to decision-making processes using concrete examples of success stories. There are no reasons for further delays in reducing climate vulnerabilities using concrete adaptation actions, on adaptation as the price is too costly to endure by present and future generation. By highlighting the opportunities that comes with adaptation, CC DARE Lessons for Adaptation provides the right ingredient to spur us into bigger actions with greater policy attention.

Community-based Climate Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Planning: A Cook Islands Pilot Project

This publication captures and shares the process, tools, and lessons from a pilot adaptation project in the Cook Islands. The basic idea was to field-test a participatory approach that incorporates local knowledge and engages vulnerable communities in the formulation of adaptation plans that will be operable and most relevant to their circumstances. This document hopes to provide insights into how climate change adaptation may be strengthened and accelerated through community-based risk assessment and participatory planning.

Managing Risks and Increasing Resilience: The Mayor's Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

From the Executive Summary:

London is already vulnerable to extreme weather, in the form of floods, droughts, heatwaves and very cold weather. Without action, further climate change, London’s population growth, and other changes (eg changes to make-up of London’s population and land cover) will increase the risk of severe impacts. London has already experienced some changes to its climate and we should expect warmer wetter winters and hotter, drier summers in the future. Extreme weather, such as heatwaves and very heavy rainfall is expected to become more frequent and intense. Very cold winters will still occur, though they will become less frequent. Sea levels will rise for centuries.

Preparing for extreme weather and further climate change is about managing risks and increasing our resilience to them - it is therefore as much about the economy, quality of life and social equality, as about the environment. Early action today will not only manage current and future risks, but save Londoners money and create jobs.

Many of our vulnerabilities to climate impacts stem from London’s ‘urbanisation’. Restoring greenspaces and building community capacity will increase our resilience and improve our quality of life. The Mayor does not have the power or the budgets to adapt London on his own. However through this strategy he can provide a framework for collective action, identifying where he is uniquely placed to act and where other organisations, and even Londoners themselves, can lead or facilitate action.