Disaster Preparedness and Response Planning in Barnstable County, Cape Cod

Location

United States
41° 46' 14.2644" N, 70° 15' 2.8548" W
US
Organization: 
Summary: 

The Cape Cod Commission has developed disaster preparedness materials to assist local officials and residents prepare for natural coastal hazard risks, including climate change. In addition, the Commission has incorporated climate change considerations into the siting and design of coastal infrastructure. The primary climate impacts that will affect Cape Cod’s coastlines include flooding, sea level rise, erosion, coastal storms, and changes in precipitation.

Adapting People and Nature to Maine’s Changing Climate

Location

United States
45° 37' 18.1992" N, 69° 11' 12.3612" W
US
Summary: 

Maine has just begun the process of building adaptation into its climate change framework. The state has been involved in mitigation activities since 2004 and the Legislature directed the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to develop adaptation recommendations in 2009. The recommendations span the built, natural, coastal, and social environments and have been passed on to the State Legislature as of February 2010.

Preparing for Climate Change in California’s East Bay Municipal Utility District

Location

United States
37° 49' 4.1232" N, 122° 19' 43.1184" W
US
Summary: 

The East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) has developed mitigation and adaptation strategies to address the effects of climate change on water resources in the San Francisco Bay Area. These strategies include reducing greenhouse gas emissions, incorporating climate change into planning efforts, and creating a monitoring and response plan to inform planning for infrastructure and water quantity and quality in the face of climate change.

Using Robust Decisionmaking as a Tool for Water Resources Planning in Southern California

Location

United States
33° 57' 25.308" N, 117° 24' 19.4256" W
US
Summary: 

Water planners have been struggling to incorporate the impacts of climate change into their planning process due to the inherent uncertainties in regards to the type and magnitude of impacts that will be experienced at the local level. To help water planners incorporate climate change into their long-term plans, the RAND Corporation piloted the Robust Decisionmaking (RDM) tool in the Southern California region in collaboration with the Inland Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA).

Water Utility Climate Alliance

Location

82222 Lance Creek , WY
United States
43° 1' 56.8848" N, 104° 38' 30.8508" W
Wyoming US
Summary: 

The Water Utility Climate Alliance (WUCA) is a coalition formed in 2007 to help water and wastewater utilities prepare for the impacts of climate change. WUCA is dedicated to collaborating on climate change issues affecting drinking water utilities. Members are located throughout the United States from southern California to New York City. Some of these members are now engaged in the Piloting Utility Modeling Applications for Climate Change project, which seeks to identify the best climate modeling tools and data to assist utilities respond to climate change.

PlaNYC: A Comprehensive Sustainability Plan for New York City

Location

38 Murray St
10007 New York , NY
United States
40° 42' 49.5144" N, 74° 0' 34.3908" W
New York US
Organization: 
Summary: 

New York City is a large emitter of greenhouse gases and will be vulnerable to impacts of climate change such as sea level rise, warming temperatures, and storm surge. In 2007, PlaNYC, a comprehensive sustainability plan for New York City, was released and outlined for the development of a greener city over the next 25 years.

Xeni Gwet'in Community-based Climate Adaptation Plan

For resource-dependent communities, such as many First Nations in British Columbia, climate change may increasingly compound existing vulnerabilities as the availability and quality of natural resources that they heavily depend upon decline. Limited resources and capacities for responding to stresses, such as wildfires, floods, and droughts will increasingly constrain their ability to meet basic needs and become self-governing. There is, therefore, an urgent need to begin reducing current vulnerabilities and enhancing adaptive capacity of the communities so that people of these communities can face the longer-term impacts of climate change with resilience.

The Xeni Gwet’in First Nation is one of six Tsilhqot’in communities in the Cariboo-Chilcotin, occupying one of the last intact ecosystems on the east side of the Chilcotin range. While the community is relatively dynamic and healthy, it is still healing from the effects of colonization and the residential school system, and it is increasingly experiencing stress over resource use conflicts in their traditional territory (Xeni Gwet’in Caretaker Area) and some of the early impacts of climate change (forest fire and fish stock declines). These impacts alone have left the Xeni Gwet’in somewhat anxious for their future but also determined to face it on their own terms. They envision a development and human activity in the Xeni Gwet’in Caretaker Area, which is grounded in an ecosystem-based approach to land use, minimizing human impact on the land and waters, leaving it as much as possible as a self-sustaining, wild environment with clean water, clean air and abundant fish and wildlife.

Incorporating Climate Change into Research and Management at Mass Audubon

Location

208 South Great Road
01773 Lincoln , MA
United States
42° 24' 36.9828" N, 71° 19' 56.4312" W
Massachusetts US
Organization: 
Summary: 

Mass Audubon is integrating climate change into many aspects of its work. In addition to supporting measures to reduce fossil fuel emissions and increase renewable energy resources for the state, Mass Audubon has also incorporated climate change into its education, research, management, and policy efforts.

Assessing the Risk of 100-year Freshwater Floods in the Lamprey River Watershed of New Hampshire Resulting from Climate Change and Land Use

Location

United States
43° 2' 51.5364" N, 70° 54' 50.4036" W
US
Summary: 

The Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, the University of New Hampshire, and Antioch University New England are working to improve information regarding flood risk in the Lamprey River Watershed in New Hampshire. This project will develop a methodology for assessing flood risks and, based on future land use and climate change scenarios, will provide decision makers, planners, and the public with products to support land use decision-making.