The Ojai Community Defense Zone Project: A Southern California Climate Change Adaptation Case Study

Location

Ojai
United States
34° 26' 58.7076" N, 119° 14' 33.0576" W
US
Organization: 
Summary: 

Climate change may affect the ability to achieve on-the-ground project goals and objectives. The following case study demonstrates how climate change vulnerability and adaptation information can be integrated into existing and future fire and fuels management projects to increase overall project resilience.

Monitoring Climate Effects in Temperate Marine Ecosystems

This report has been prepared by EcoAdapt for the MPA Monitoring Enterprise. The MPA Monitoring Enterprise, a program of the California Ocean Science Trust, is tasked with developing and implementing monitoring of California’s emerging statewide MPA network. While climate change is not explicitly incorporated into the goals and objectives of California’s MPAs, future evaluations of MPA performance will occur in the context of a changing climate and associated changing oceanographic environment. Moreover, MPA monitoring in California provides a framework that can be applied to inform the climate change management dialogue. A statewide network of MPAs, in which other anthropogenic stressors are reduced, provides a large-scale, natural laboratory to understand how climate changes manifest in ocean ecosystems. Thus, this presents a timely opportunity to develop and recommend an approach to most efficiently and effectively augment MPA monitoring to provide additional information. This information should aid in the interpretation of MPA monitoring results but also can be designed to inform the management dialogue around potential climate change effects on marine ecosystems and adaptation or mitigation measures.

The Monitoring Enterprise engaged EcoAdapt to develop and recommend an approach to supplement MPA monitoring with climate change monitoring that can track climate change effects 

 

San Diego River Coastal Sage Scrub Restoration Project: A Southern California Climate Change Adaptation Case Study

Location

San Diego River CA
United States
32° 46' 12.9432" N, 117° 9' 11.61" W
California US
Organization: 
Summary: 

Climate change may affect the ability to achieve on-the-ground project goals and objectives. The following case study demonstrates how climate change vulnerability and adaptation information can be integrated into existing and future habitat restoration projects to increase overall project resilience.

Climate Change Adaptation Strategies for Resources of the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests

This report summarizes the results of a two-day adaptation planning workshop for the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests as part of their forest plan revision process. The workshop focused on identifying adaptation options for eight key resource areas, including forested vegetation, non-forested vegetation, wildlife, hydrology, fisheries, recreation, cultural/heritage values, and ecosystem services. The report includes a general overview of the workshop methodology and provides a suite of possible adaptation strategies and actions for each key resource area. Adaptation actions were linked with the climate-related vulnerabilities they help to ameliorate as well as the direct/indirect effects they may have on other resource areas.

Climate resilience evaluation and awareness tool exercise with North Hudson Sewerage Authority and New York-New Jersey Harbor Estuary Program

EPA’s Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) and Climate Ready Estuaries (CRE) initiatives are working to coordinate their efforts and support climate change risk assessment and adaptation planning. This report details a recent exercise that provided an opportunity for these parties to collaborate on assessment and planning with respect to potential climate change impacts on utility infrastructure and natural resources. The Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool (CREAT) was used to support the collaborative process of identifying climate change threats, assessing potential consequences, and evaluating adaptation options for both a utility and for the overall watershed.

Climate Change and Adaptation; Options for the Management of Forests Under a Changing Climate

This presentation reviews approaches to adaptation, including short-term and long-term management options that reduce stressors and focus on enabling plants, animals and people to respond to climate influences. Challenges include a limited capacity to detect change, and societal challenge in prioritizing adaptation. The talk provides examples of climate adaptation strategies from several forests and locations, and tactical steps that managers can use to review, rank, resolve climate issues.

North American Marine Protected Area Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool

The North American Marine Protected Area Rapid Vulnerability Assessment Tool was created to help marine protected area managers evaluate the implications of climate change for the habitats of their sites. This tool has three parts (a user guide, a set of blank worksheets, and a booklet containing sample completed worksheets) that are available as downloadable PDFs. The blank worksheets are in a dynamic PDF format so that users can easily fill, save and share their completed worksheets. The User Guide and sample worksheets provide the narrative explanation of how to use the tool, while the blank worksheets are the hands-on component. Together, they comprise a tool that can help marine protected area managers conduct a rapid vulnerability assessment and adaptation strategy development process.

Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal

Tool Overview: 

Simulations of future climate suggest profiles of temperature and precipitation may differ significantly from those in the past. Future changes in climate, specifically changes in temperature, and the type, timing, and distribution of precipitation may lead to changes in the hydrologic cycle. As such, natural resource managers are in need of tools that can provide estimates of key components of the hydrologic cycle, uncertainty associated with the estimates, and limitations associated with the climate data used to estimate these components. To help address this need, the U.S.

Hydrologic and Water Quality System (HAWQS)

Tool Overview: 

The Hydrologic and Water Quality System (HAWQS) is a web-based interactive water quantity and quality modeling system that employs as its core modeling engine the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), an internationally-recognized public domain model. HAWQS provides users with interactive web interfaces and maps; pre-loaded input data; outputs that include tables, charts, and raw output data; a user guide, and online development, execution, and storage of a user's modeling projects.