Union of Concerned Scientists

Overview

The Union of Concerned Scientists puts rigorous, independent science to work to solve our planet's most pressing problems. Joining with citizens across the country, we combine technical analysis and effective advocacy to create innovative, practical solutions for a healthy, safe, and sustainable future.

What began as a collaboration between students and faculty members at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1969 is now an alliance of more than 400,000 citizens and scientists. UCS members are people from all walks of life: parents and businesspeople, biologists and physicists, teachers and students. Our members understand that scientific analysis—not political calculations or corporate hype—should guide our efforts to secure responsible changes in government policy, corporate practices, and consumer choices.

Our experts work on some of the world's most complex and daunting problems: stemming the tide of global warming, finding sustainable ways to feed, power and transport ourselves, and reducing the threat of catastrophic war. Our achievements over the decades show that thoughtful action based on the best available science can help safeguard our future and the future of our planet.

The Union of Concerned Scientists puts rigorous, independent science to work to solve our planet's most pressing problems. Joining with citizens across the country, we combine technical analysis and effective advocacy to create innovative, practical solutions for a healthy, safe, and sustainable future.

Regional Work

California and Western States

A global leader in climate action, California has the nation's most comprehensive, economy-wide global warming pollution reduction program.

Midwest States

Across the Midwest, records show that spring is arriving sooner, dangerously hot weather is occurring more often, and winters are becoming warmer and less snowy.

Northeast States

Sea levels are rising much faster along the Northeast and mid-Atlantic coast than globally, steadily increasing the risk of destructive coastal flooding events.

Southeast States

Increasing temperatures, accelerating sea level rise, and more frequent and intense heat waves are just some of the climate impacts that Southeast states can expect.

(617) 547-5552

Keywords

Scale
Multilateral / Transboundary