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Alessandra Score

Lead Scientist

Alex Score is a scientist with more than 20 years of experience as a marine biologist, and has worked to preserve and protect coral reefs, fisheries, and sensitive coastal habitats.  In 2009 she joined EcoAdapt to focus her work on climate change adaptation in coastal and marine systems.  Prior to joining EcoAdapt, she served as World Wildlife Fund Florida Program Marine Conservation Specialist.  Alex was born in Costa Rica, and has a Bachelor of Science degree in Marine Biology from Florida Institute of Technology and a Master of Science degree in Biology from Georgia Southern University. She has extensive experience in technical outreach and working in advancing management through stakeholder support. She was happy to participate in the National Marine Sanctuaries Sustainable Seas Expedition as Deep Worker Pilot and work on the characterization of soft corals and invertebrates communities off Georgia, Florida, and Gulf Coast.

Resources:

Sector Addressed: 
Aquaculture
Climate Justice
Conservation / Restoration
Development (socioeconomic)
Disaster Risk Management
Education / Outreach
Fisheries
Land Use Planning
Policy
Public Health
Research
Rural / Indigenous Livelihoods
Tourism / Recreation
Transportation / Infrastructure
Water Resources
Wildlife

Alex

Document
Sector Addressed: 
Economics
Climate Justice
Energy
Sector Addressed: 
Aquaculture
Fisheries

A Climate Change Action Plan for the Florida Reef Tract (2010-2015)

This photo has been released into the public domain because it contains materials that originally came from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. No endorsement by licensor implied.

Case Study
Sector Addressed: 
Conservation / Restoration
Fisheries
Summary: 

Coral reefs are extremely vulnerable to climate change impacts, especially when combined with existing stresses such as land-based sources of pollution, habitat degradation, and overfishing. EcoAdapt has been working on a climate change action plan for Florida's reefs as result of the Reef Resilience conference recommendations in 2008.