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Alaska Native Villages: Limited Progress Has Been Made on Relocating Villages Threatened by Flooding and Erosion

Created: 6/29/2009 - Updated: 3/15/2019

Abstract

While the flooding and erosion threats to Alaska Native villages have not been completely assessed, since 2003, federal, state, and village officials have identified 31 villages that face imminent threats. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (Corps) March 2009 Alaska Baseline Erosion Assessment identified many villages threatened by erosion, but did not assess flooding impacts. At least 12 of the 31 threatened villages have decided to relocate—in part or entirely—or to explore relocation options. 

Published On

Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Keywords

Scale: 
Community / Local
State / Provincial
Sector Addressed: 
Rural / Indigenous Livelihoods
Target Climate Changes and Impacts: 
Erosion
Flooding
Type of Adaptation Action/Strategy: 
Natural Resource Management / Conservation
Capacity Building
Conduct vulnerability assessments and studies
Monitor climate change impacts and adaptation efficacy
Infrastructure, Planning, and Development
Managed retreat of built infrastructure, relocation of people/communities
Governance and Policy
Create new or enhance existing policies or regulations
Climate Type: 
Subpolar

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This photo has been released into the public domain because it contains materials that originally came from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. No endorsement by licensor implied.

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This photo has been released into the public domain because it contains materials that originally came from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. No endorsement by licensor implied.

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