Critical Stakeholder Engagement: The Road to Actionable Science Is Paved with Scientists’ Good Intentions

Aparna Bamzai-Dodson, Amanda E. Cravens, Renee A. McPherson
Posted on: 5/20/2024 - Updated on: 5/20/2024

Posted by

CAKE Team

Published

Abstract

To help stakeholders such as planners, resource managers, policymakers, and decision makers address environmental challenges in the Anthropocene, scientists are increasingly creating actionable science—science that is useful, usable, and used. Critical physical geography encourages the engagement of stakeholders in the creation of scientific knowledge to conduct actionable science and produce outputs that are directly relevant to stakeholder plans, decisions, or actions. Many scientists, however, lack formal training in how to partner with stakeholders using effective and ethical practices. 

In this article, we use the core principles for ethical research of respect for persons, beneficence, and justice from the Belmont Report (1979) as a suggested framework to examine the perspectives of stakeholders engaged in climate adaptation science projects. We argue that this framework aligns with the principles of critical physical geography and provides guidance for scientists to make their research more actionable while placing necessary emphasis on ethical considerations. We also challenge scientists to consider the broader ethical implications of engaging with these partners.

Citation

Bamzai-Dodson, A., Cravens, A.E., McPherson, R.A. (2024). Critical Stakeholder Engagement: The Road to Actionable Science Is Paved with Scientists’ Good Intentions. Annals of the American Association of Geographers, 114:1, 1-20, DOI: 10.1080/24694452.2023.2242448.

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