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Helping Your Woodland Adapt to a Changing Climate

Marcus Griswold, Tracey Saxby, and Caroline Wicks (Eds.)
Created: 12/18/2013 - Updated: 2/12/2019

Abstract

Your woods are always changing and adapting as they grow and mature, or regrow after agricultural abandonment, natural disturbances, or harvesting activities. Events like storms, droughts, insect and disease outbreaks, or other stressors can damage trees or slow their growth. A changing climate may make your woods more susceptible to the problems these events can cause.

Step 1. Learn more about your woodsStep 2. Contact a foresterStep 3. Identify your goals & objectivesStep 4. Develop and implement a forest stewardship plan

Published On

Saturday, August 31, 2013

Keywords

Sector Addressed: 
Conservation / Restoration
Forestry
Land Use Planning
Type of Adaptation Action/Strategy: 
Natural Resource Management / Conservation
Incorporate future conditions into natural resources planning and policies
Habitat/Biome Type: 
Terrestrial
Forest
Taxonomic Focus: 
Plants

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