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Introduction to COAST: A Tool for Community-led Climate Adaptation Planning

Sam Merrill
Created: 11/19/2013 - Updated: 8/14/2019

Abstract

As more cities and regions are hit hard by storms, public pressure for better infrastructure planning is growing. A consensus is emerging that in many cases, “putting it back the way it was” is not the right answer. Community leaders may be ready to take new actions to adapt to changing conditions, but may also be unsure whether such new ideas are good investments. They may well ask: “How much should we pay to lower risks, and where is the line between a wise choice and a foolish one?”

During this webinar for grantees from the Partnership for Sustainable Communities, Sam Merrill from the New England Environmental Finance Center introduced participants to COAST, a free, interactive tool that is being used in communities around the country to evaluate the costs and benefits of various adaptation options to sea level rise and storm surge.

Hosted by the Water Infrastructure Capacity Building Team through the HUD/EPA Capacity Building for Sustainable Communities Program.

 

Published On

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Keywords

Sector Addressed: 
Disaster Risk Management
Economics
Research
Target Climate Changes and Impacts: 
Erosion
Flooding
Habitat extent
Salinization / Saltwater intrusion
Sea level rise
Storms or extreme weather events
Type of Adaptation Action/Strategy: 
Capacity Building
Conduct / Gather additional research, data, and products
Conduct scenario planning exercise
Monitor climate change impacts and adaptation efficacy
Create/enhance resources and tools
Habitat/Biome Type: 
Coastal

Related Resources

Coastal Maine and New Hampshire Analyze Impacts of Climate Change with New Tool

Photo attributed to Daderot. This work has been released into the public domain by its author. No endorsement by licensor implied.

Case Study
Summary: 

In Hampton and Seabrook, New Hampshire and Portland, Maine, climate change adaptation processes are underway, but stand to be greatly enhanced by their use of the Coastal Adaptation to Sea Level Rise Tool (COAST).