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Managing Changing Landscapes in the Southwestern United States

Carolyn Enquist and Marcos Robles
Created: 12/31/2010 - Updated: 3/12/2019

Abstract

This regional assessment examines the impacts of temperature change from 1951-2006 on natural resources in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah. It documents that warming has already affected habitats, watersheds, and species in the Southwest, by influencing the timing of seasonal events or amplifying the impacts of natural disturbances such as wildfire and drought. The report concludes that to begin adapting to climate change, natural resource managers should reevaluate the effectiveness of current restoration tools, modify resource objectives, learn from climate-smart adaptive management and monitoring, and share information across boundaries.

Published On

Saturday, January 1, 2011

Keywords

Scale: 
Regional / Subnational
Sector Addressed: 
Conservation / Restoration
Forestry
Water Resources
Target Climate Changes and Impacts: 
Air temperature
Biodiversity
Fire
Growing season
Invasive / non-native species, pests
Precipitation
Range shifts
Tourism
Water quality
Water supply
Water temperature
Type of Adaptation Action/Strategy: 
Natural Resource Management / Conservation
Capacity Building
Climate Type: 
Temperate
Sociopolitical Setting: 
Rural
Suburban

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