Reality of Resilience: perspectives of the 2015–16 drought in Ethiopia

Roop Singh, Mulugeta Worku, Solomon Bogale, Adrian Cullis, Alebachew Adem, Ben Irwin, Sheri Lim, Lorenzo Bosi, and Courtenay Cabot Venton
Created: 1/03/2017 -

Abstract

This report highlights lessons from the 2015–16 drought in Ethiopia, including how and why different communities were impacted, effective approaches to resilience building and challenges faced.

Key messages:

  • The timing and spatial distribution of rainfall, beyond total deficits, impacted livelihood activities such as agriculture and pastoralism during the 2015–16 drought in Ethiopia.
  • Early response costs less and results in better outcomes. Mechanisms that trigger early funding based on pre-agreed indicators are critical to overcome some of the political, institutional and media effects that have kept the humanitarian system in a state of crisis response.
  • Flexible funding and adaptive programming is needed for humanitarian and development organisations implementing projects. This will pivot funds, depending on need, and help stimulate more timely action.
  • There is increasing evidence that financial services such as index-based insurance are an important part of building resilience. These services need to be accessible to the most vulnerable people.

Keywords

Scale
Community / Local
Sector Addressed
Climate Justice
Culture/communities
Development (socioeconomic)
Disaster Risk Management
Rural / Indigenous Livelihoods
Habitat/Biome Type
Terrestrial
Region
International