Tribal Energy System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather

Created: 8/01/2017 - Updated: 8/01/2017

Abstract

Climate change and extreme weather events are already affecting the way that American Indian and Alaska Native tribes are using, receiving, and producing energy. As climate change worsens, energy infrastructure in the United States—including tribal energy infrastructure—is expected to be increasingly threatened by higher temperatures, less available water, and more frequent and intense heavy downpours, floods, heat waves, and droughts. Tribal energy systems are also vulnerable to extreme weather events, such as thunderstorms, tornadoes, and winter storms, which can severely damage infrastructure that tribes rely on to deliver power and fuel. This report describes vulnerabilities of tribal energy systems related to both climate change and extreme weather.

Published On

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Keywords

Region: 
Scale: 
Tribal / First Nation
Sector Addressed: 
Climate Justice
Disaster Risk Management
Energy
Policy
Rural / Indigenous Livelihoods
Target Climate Changes and Impacts: 
Storms or extreme weather events
Type of Adaptation Action/Strategy: 
Capacity Building
Governance and Policy