1. Respondents

Participants in the interviews and Figure 3.surveys primarily included public health officials (30%) (Table 3). The largest number of participants overall represent state health agencies (31%), followed by county (20%), nongovernmental (19%), and city (17%) agencies (Figure 3). Respondents represented one or more of the following aspects of public health – physical (80%), mental (42%), behavioral (35%), and healthcare infrastructure
(e.g., hospitals, clinics) (28%).

Table 3. Interviewee and survey participants’ position types (n=54).

Public Health Official
Scientist/Researcher
Manager
Epidemiologist
Physician/Nurse/Assistant
Emergency Planner/Manager
Communications/Education
Environmental Consultant
Government Official

30%
19%
10%
9%
7%
7%
6%
6%
6%

 

Respondents were also asked to indicate the state(s) in which they work (Figure 4). Most respondents represent Oregon (10%), Washington (9%), Illinois (8%), and Virginia (8%).

Figure 4.

Ninety-eight percent of participants agree that climate change is having or is likely to have a significant effect on public health (Figure 5). Overall, respondents indicate that they are very (58%) or moderately (36%) knowledgeable about climate change (Figure 6).

Figure 5.